Vaulted Ceiling and Wall Removal?

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Old 07-07-20, 12:37 PM
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Vaulted Ceiling and Wall Removal?

I’m looking to better understand the support structure and potential load bearing walls due to a vaulted ceiling in my house. Our master bath is quite small and we are considering taking out a wall to expand and take over the guest bedroom that is next door. We will of course get a contractor to assess prior to any renovations, however none of that is expected to start until the pandemic is over. For now, we are just looking to see if there is anything glaring that clearly states ‘The wall cannot be removed so the bathroom cannot get any larger’ or ‘The wall could probably be removed' so we can start planning. We’re trying to figure out if this is even worth pursuing any further.

Attached are some pictures of the rooms that share the wall. What has me confused are the two vertical ‘beams/supports’ that are seen in the Master Bedroom picture. I don’t see something similar in the master bath, but that's probably right about where the wall is that separates the master bedroom from the bath. You can also see from the picture of the Master Bath that there is a horizontal ‘lip’ on the drywall which seems to be at a height that would be similar to where a joist is.

Ideally we'd take out the entire bathroom/guest bedroom wall up to the ceiling. If that's not possible because there is a joist there that needs to remain, we'd still be willing to remove the wall but leave the joist or anything else that needs to remain for the truss and figure out a way to pull it into the room's design.

Is there an obvious answer as to whether or not the bathroom/guest bedroom wall is load bearing?

Does it appear as though it could be removed, whether all the way to the ceiling or even just to the joist?



This wall continues into the master bathroom. I'd like to remove the portion in the bathroom but am not sure if it can be done due to vaulted ceiling and necessary support.


This is the wall I'd like to remove to extend bathroom into Guest Bedroom.


This is the wall I'd like to remove to extend bathroom into Guest Bedroom.


Other side of master bath wall.


Other side of master bedroom wall.
 
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Old 07-07-20, 05:50 PM
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It's a little hard to answer when we cant stick our head in the attic to look. If your ceiling and roof are scissors trusses, you can likely remove any part of the interior wall. But we can't say for sure since we arent there. I assume all the ceilings are the same height? (When measured from floor to peak)
 
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Old 07-08-20, 04:42 AM
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I agree, you need a look in the attic to see how your roof is framed. Often engineered roof trusses are load bearing on the house's exterior wall only but the ceiling of the master bedroom seems complex so I would not make any guesses based on what you see from below.

I am also curious why there are two bump outs high up on the master bedroom wall. I find it suspicious that they start at about the same elevation as the top of the ceiling joists. Your master bath also has an odd bump out in the wall that has me wondering what's going on structurally.
 
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Old 07-08-20, 10:57 AM
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Thanks, guys. Good questions. So the house actually doesn't even have an attic so I can't look. There are two other bedrooms on this top floor (not pictured) that have your traditional 8 ft ceiling. But even those do not have access to an attic or any kind of space.

To add some clarity, the ceiling in the master bed and bath both follow the roof pitch. So I guess that makes it a cathedral ceiling? The foyer and the guest bedroom do not follow the pitch. The high point on that side of the wall is lower than the master. I'm assuming that means scissor trusses are used above the foyer and guest bedroom. I'm stumped on what is going on in that wall where it transitions from vaulted to cathedral ceiling, and like Pilot Dane says, I don't know what's in that's caused the protrusions in the walls or if the bath wall could be removed.
 
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