Door jamb proud of wall (by a lot)


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Old 04-08-21, 12:58 PM
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Door jamb proud of wall (by a lot)

I installed new door on this closet. At the moment, the casing is nailed to the jamb only. The wall is quite warped (studs are bowed in here), so the casing has a variable gap to the wall. The attached pic shows the worst spot - the max gap is just shy of 3/8"; for reference, the casing is 5/8" thick.

Thinking of filling this gap with shims, then nailing the fat part of casing to the studs (can't nail it w/o shimming b/c that would pull casing away from jamb and ruin the mitered joints). Then caulk that shimmed gap, then paint. Not pretty, but probably no one will notice unless they have nothing better to do than look at door trim.

Any other practical options?



Separately, on the entry doorway to this room, I have an area where the drywall is quite proud of the jamb. Thinking I'll scribe a line on drywall where edge of casing will sit, then remove the excess drywall using hammer and scraper. All the other gaps on both doors are comfortably within the realm of caulk + paint + forget about it.
 
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Old 04-08-21, 02:05 PM
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Yep, that sounds good.
 
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Old 05-10-21, 02:39 PM
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That should work, and this is an example of how your walls turn out when you don't cherry pick straight studs out of the stack of rejects at HD or Lowes.
 
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Old 05-10-21, 07:30 PM
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For anyone who finds this thread searching on the same issue, what I ended up doing was using clamps to pull the casing to the wall, then shooting in nails to hold it. Then working down (away from the mitered corner) in small sections. The casing is more flexible than I thought it was (probably won't work as well if you're using 3/4" thick casing).

Worked out great for the areas where jamb was quite proud of the wall.

For one area where wall was quite proud of the jamb, I removed the drywall - marked a line where casing would sit, then deeply scored the line with a utility knife, then hammered the drywall so that it crumbled and could be easily removed.
 
 

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