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Finishing an A-Frame Cabin's Second Story Ceiling

Finishing an A-Frame Cabin's Second Story Ceiling


  #1  
Old 07-03-21, 12:26 PM
K
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Finishing an A-Frame Cabin's Second Story Ceiling

I live in a two story A-frame cabin. Itís well built and more like an actual house. However, there are still improvements that need to be made to make it more house-like. The entire house inside is finished with pine tongue-and-groove board right on the studs. There is insulation in all the vertical studded walls.

Given itís an A-Frame, the second story is mostly sloped walls. Those however, are NOT insulated. I gets really cold in the winter up there, and really hot in the summer. You put your hand to the wall and totally feel the outside.

I want to start insulating upstairs over in the master bedroom. The roof/ceiling paneling is supported with 4x6 beams at meet at the very top. Hereís what Iím trying to decide:

1. I donít need to see the beams necessarily. Iím considering adding a bit of 2x6 framing in between the beams. Then running some Romex for recessed lighting, filling the entire cavity with 6 inch insulation and then putting tongue and groove pine board horizontally over it all.

2. Alternatively, I could do the same, but put sheetrock over the framing and beams, THEN after the sheetrock is up, install the tongue-and-groove paneling over it all for the wood finish. This method would be more work but would also be more robust. This is the method I would use downstairs as itís fire-hardened. Iím not too concerned upstairs because in case of having to escape a fire, you want the bottom floor, and bottom floor ceiling to as fire resistant as possible. This upstairs section, if it were to catch fire, weíd already be out.

3. The last option would be to not use full 6 inch insulation and rather frame with 2x3ís. Then use either method above, but in between each beam, rather than over it all. This one might look the best since it still shows the beams.

I would love some feedback on the above so I can start drawing it out and planning for materials. Thank you.




 
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Old 07-03-21, 12:45 PM
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Let me see if I can add two more photos...



 
  #3  
Old 07-03-21, 04:18 PM
J
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A frames are a nightmare to try and insulate!
The right way, but it's to late now is to have built it with sip roofing panels for the sheathing on the roof.
Second way, but not cheap is to have it foam insulated, that way you would not need baffles, add a ridge vent, and need to build out the rafters to add the proper amount of insulation.
 
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Old 07-03-21, 05:30 PM
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Hi Joe,

Thanks for the feedback. I understand corners were cut when this was built. However, we've lived here for a good few years now, full-time. We manage with the cold down to 20s just fine with just a space heater upstairs and a wood stove downstairs. Summers are worst I think.

What I plan on doing will be a big improvement. Now, I did think about the venting... One reason I think I'll stay away from making an attic... Though if NEED venting either way, I can install some other type of vent that I can do with what I have to work with.

I mean, I have access to the very top. And the more I think about it, the more I think considering adding drywall, then the wood paneling on top.

It's REALLY dry here in California. If I go from the very top, skip adding and attic, and just add insulation between the rafters, hang sheetrock over that, then the wood paneling... would I really need venting?

I would add framing perpendicular to the rafters in order to have somewhere to screw the drywall on. This would also reinforce the roof more, even though it's pretty strong as it is.

I feel this will make a huge difference not only in temperature control, but also in looks.
 
 

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