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Texturing patched drywall with hopper and gun

Texturing patched drywall with hopper and gun


  #1  
Old 01-10-22, 02:53 PM
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Texturing patched drywall with hopper and gun

I finally got around to closing up holes plumbers left in the walls and ceiling of our laundry room. Both are orange peel; the walls being light and the ceiling heavy, but nothing is knowck down. In the past I have always used the spray can texture with just okay results but now I am thinking of getting an inexpensive little hopper and gun from Harbor Freight as I will need to spray 60 to 100 sq ft. (I might use it later for some smaller repairs in one of the rooms.)

My question is whether my old Craftsman oil less hot dog compressor is up to the job. It has a 3 gallon tank and is rated for 3.7 CFM @ 40 PSI and 2.4 CFM @ 90. Should I be able to shoot for a second or two and then rest a bit for the compressor to catch up?
 
  #2  
Old 01-10-22, 04:14 PM
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Yes, the compressor should get the job done by that method. Whether you'll be able to use the hopper to achieve a result you like might be a different matter. I would definitely practice on cardboard or other scrap material first.
 
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Old 01-10-22, 04:30 PM
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With a 3 gallon, you will likely have to take a bunch of breaks but it will get the job done. I have sprayed many walls and ceilings using a similar sprayer and a 20-gallon compressor. Popcorn, knockdown, and orange peel.
 
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Old 01-10-22, 05:37 PM
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What does the HF require for air volume? Yes experiment first. 40psi is about the maximum you want for texturing.
Remember you are not looking for 100% coverage.
 
  #5  
Old 01-10-22, 07:04 PM
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Thanks all. On the box it says the "recommended working pressure: 90 PSI" and a compressor delivering 8 CFM @ 90 PSI. Mine only delivers 2.4 @ 90. The box also posts a comprssor requirement of 30+ gallons for continuous spraying, 7-29 for intermittent, and a 1- 6 gallon compressor is "not recommended". Considering I plan to shoot at around 30 to 40 PSI, I don't expect things to be ideal with my little compressor, but hope to get by with it if I practice using it.

Tightcoat's comment re using a maximum psu of 40 is consistent with what I gathered in another forum from people who have used theis Harbor Freeight texture gun as well as better equipment. So I bought it and am in for a penny and a pound.
 
  #6  
Old 01-11-22, 02:25 AM
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I think your compressor will do ok. Yrs ago I worked for an outfit that issued me one of those little tankless diaphragm compressors. They only put out about 25psi [constant] and I've sprayed many repairs using it with no issues.
 
  #7  
Old 01-11-22, 10:55 AM
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I have used that little sprayer. It is a little easier to handle than the larger professional guns. It is handy for patching. It does not have a large enough throat to spray stucco. I have not tried it with acoustic. it might not be large enough for acoustic to flow either. it is great foe orange peel and knockdown. If you install a shutoff at the gun you can stop the air flow there while you let the compressor catch up. I am thinking maybe you can spray with what you have, just barely, without stopping. You have a lot of variables to help you get the right texture: mud consistency, Sprayer orifice, amount of mud flow (This is regulated by how far you pull the trigger and once you eat it right you can keep it at that position by adjusting the knob at he back of the gun),air pressure and distance from the target. And when you are experimenting and practicing you can spray a bit and wipe it off and try again. you donít have to have a new piece of wall board or cardboard for each variable.
 
  #8  
Old 01-11-22, 12:42 PM
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Thanks all. I note that marksr has helped me over several years with projects. I hear you tightcoat and have bought the Harbor freight gun. I am pretty well done with mudding the seeks of where I replaced drywall and this afternoon will practice spraying in my garage, which is still pretty well set up as a spray booth. (One of the projects I started before the pandemic shut everything down.) If we weren't movint, and I wasn't getting a little long in the tooth, I would just buy another sprayer. If permitted, I would like to do a lot of fix it projects where we move. I think the boss and the doctors, of which one is my son, will make me stop, but I love working with my hands.

As is, I have a lot of scrap drywall and plywood. Been here 30 years and never toss anything out. One of the problems with getting the house ready for market.
 
 

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