Welcome to the DoItYourself Forums!

To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. It's free!

How to install crown molding with uneven ceilings


LBE's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-19-02, 10:48 PM   #1  
LBE
How to install crown molding with uneven ceilings

I have marked my walls with blue chalk lines after having set all the points at the corner of the room for my crown molding. I noticed by eye, that the celing wavers up and down a bit. So I measured that the distance from the ceiling in spots down to the wall line is off by 1/4 inch at most at some points and 1/8 inch off at all other points. ( I think the ceiling dove-tails at all 4 corners of the room. So this might be a problem for all 4 walls that I am doing!).

The room I am doing has all inside corners to do. Should I just install the molding along my marked wall line and not worry about where the molding meets the ceiling? If the gap ends up really being as big as 1/4 from the top of molding to the ceiling what should I do? Should I just put in some backer rod and some painters latex caulk. Currently that is my plan! The gap certainly exist along most of the ceiling, so will the caulk be enough to hold up the board. Also I am not sure how so much caulk will look cosmetically.

I have made a few 3-4 inch backer blocks for the molding for the points where the joist run parallel to the molding. I could also make a few more and put them at the studs where the molding ceiling gap is big. ( I cannot make too many backer blocks because I only have a miter saw and can fudge short pieces at a time... very time consuming!) I am just worried about getting their placement exactly right so as to not interfere with the molding placement itself........or is caulk enough?

 
Sponsored Links
woodbadger's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-20-02, 06:50 AM   #2  
woodbadger
Are you going to paint the crown molding or stain it?

Are your walls and ceiling both made out of sheetrock?

If "yes paint", and "yes sheetrock on the ceiling", I would use joint compound to fill the gap at the ceiling. You can buy it in a tube just like caulk, and it makes your finish work a lot easier.

Put a bead of compound on the top edge. nail molding to wall studs on your snap line. push molding up to ceiling and nail into ceiling trusses. Use putty knife to remove excess coumpound. Let dry. skimcoat compound and sand to finish. paint.

 
LBE's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-20-02, 08:02 AM   #3  
LBE
What is advantage of joint compound over latex caulk?

Thanks for the help! Yes my wall & ceiling are drywall. The walls are already painted and the crown molding has been painted prior to putting it up ( not up yet! ).

I was wondering what the advantage of joint compound would be over paintable latex caulk?

 
LBE's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-20-02, 08:14 AM   #4  
LBE
Trouble finding joint compound in a tube

I called two big hardware stores and they do not sell joint compound in a tube. Is there a source for this? I also notice there is something that plumbers use ( plumbers joint compound - but I this sounds like the wrong thing to use on walls - it is grey in color.)


I might try to put some lite topping compound that I have in a cake decorator tube ( I have to buy one... hopefully it is not too expensive?).

 
woodbadger's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-20-02, 09:02 AM   #5  
woodbadger
I saw it yesterday at Menards.
If Menards has it Home Depot most likely has it also.


The tube is only for speed of application. You can also just put it on after your molding is up. How fast technique is depends on how wavy your ceiling is.

 
LBE's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-20-02, 09:52 AM   #6  
LBE
Caulk vs Joint Compound

Why is joint compound used verses using paintable latex caulk?

Would caulk be better because it is flexible? But is caulk not correct for this application because the gap is up to 1/4 inch?

If it matters I should mention that I am putting up 2.25 crown molding.

I called Home Depot & Lowes and they do not sell joint compound in a tube. I have looked a bit online, hoping to find an online store that also has a local location, but did not find any stores this way either. I might need to make a trip to the bakery store ( i.e. cake decorating tube!)

 
woodbadger's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-20-02, 10:21 AM   #7  
woodbadger
You want to get a perfectly smooth edge so the filler and the crown molding look like one continuous surface.

Caulk will not give you this. It will fill the gap, but you will always see what is wood and what is caulk.

have you ever tried to make caulk a flat surface. Impossible. Also, if you make a mistake and there is too much caulk, you have to try to cut it out. Also difficult. If you don't have enough you would have to add a tiny bit more. tricky.

Joint compound allows you to sand where there is too much, add where there is too little, and get a perfectly smooth surface that bends into the wood. After you paint, you won't even know its there.

Great idea about using a frosting bag. A grouting bag may work as well. I will have to try it on my next job.

 
LBE's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

02-20-02, 12:52 PM   #8  
LBE
Thanks for the help - I will give compound a shot

I am going to try to use the joint compound in the really big gap areas. Fortunately for me too is the fact the ceilings are a glossy smooth surface ( I hate the fact that they are not textured, but that is a project for someone else someday!)

Thanks for the help!

 
niftynift's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

05-15-02, 03:59 PM   #9  
niftynift
I have a slightly different problem. My ceiling is uneven where it meets an outside corner. Along the wall in question, I would say that the ceiling line dips down about 3/4" at that point.

The ceiling along the other wall of this corner is level, so I installed molding up to the corner and capped it with a return piece.

However, I would like to create a complete outside corner joint. Any suggestions appreciated.

 
tinytreasures's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

05-28-02, 07:58 PM   #10  
tinytreasures
crown molding/uneven ceilings

How many corners in the room? Are you going to paint the molding or stain? Painting has a better hiding effect I've found. An idea might be to use finials on the corners, although the cutting on the outside corners is tricky. The advantage is twofold, there are only butt cuts on the crown molding and with the finial your eye is not drawn to the joint.

 
niftynift's Avatar
Visiting Guest

Posts: n/a

05-31-02, 01:49 PM   #11  
niftynift
I have 5 inside corners and 1 outside corner. I am painting the molding (MDF material), and found it works well.

I'm not sure if a finial will help with my problem with the outside corner. As I mentioned, along the first wall, the ceiling dips down about 3/4", while along the second wall, the ceiling is level.

My problem is that the molding on the first wall will dip down abruptly at the outside corner and won't be able to properly join the molding along the second wall.

I rejected the option of scribing the top of Wall-1's molding towards the outside-corner end.

As it stands, I have capped the Wall-2 molding with a return, and left Wall-1 untreated.

 
Search this Thread