Another Drywall Question

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Old 03-10-02, 09:04 AM
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Another Drywall Question

In reading about hanging drywall it's recommended to hang it in a way which gives you the least amount of seams. It's also recommended that you minimize the number of butted seams. My question is this - given a choice of more total seams but less butted seams versus less total seams but more butted seams which is the better choice? For example if I choose to mount panels vertically on a particular wall I can do it with essentially no butted seams but almost twice as many total seams. If I choose to mount it horizontally I will have about 10Ft of butted seams but only slightly more than half the number of total seams. In a scenario like this which would be the better choice?
 
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Old 03-11-02, 02:38 AM
dynagirl
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I would go for the more tapered seams as opposed to the fewer butted seams. Butted seams are much harder to spackle, especially when you're not experienced.
 
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Old 03-11-02, 05:51 AM
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Ok. Pick one way and go with it. In a residential situation it is best to hang drywall horizontally. It's the best and strongest way to do it. Stagger all your butt joints! That means if you are hanging the top section of a wall and you put a whole sheet up then a 4 foot sheet, on the bottom put a 4 foot sheet and then a whole sheet. It make the wall stronger. If you don't do this or if you hang your rock vertically you will have an eight foot butt joint. NO good. The best way to minimize butt joints is to measure and buy the correct length of drywall for the situation.
 
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Old 03-11-02, 08:21 AM
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Ok dynagirl so if I understand you correctly you would choose to mount the drywall vertically which in my case would mean about 42 ft of total/tapered seams & no butted seams(I'm dealing with a basement with an open ceiling -which I'm not finishing & total wall height of 7ft) as opposed to horizontally which if I staggered the panels would lower the number of panels I need & lower the number of total seams to about 29ft but 10ft of those would be butted.

Coops28 - I'm not sure I understand how I would end up with an eight foot butted seam if I choose to hang the panels vertically since they would only touch by their tapered sides? I understand your point about ending up with an eight foot butted seam if I don't stagger the horizontal panels.

Another side issue is that hanging them vertically would be technically easier since I'd be working alone.
 
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Old 03-12-02, 06:13 AM
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What I mean it if you hang your drywall vertically, in a residential situation, your seems will be the same as a butt joint. Even though they are tapered egde seems they act the same as a long butt joint. It will be a weaker joint. My advise is to hang them horizontally.
 
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Old 03-12-02, 11:41 AM
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Thanks for the feedback. I will go horizontal.
 
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Old 03-14-02, 06:13 PM
ewesson
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Horizontal is absolutely the way to go, as you've already been convinced. Perhaps a more important point is that the drywall is stronger in the long direction than short, so a horizontal panel is stronger than a vertical one. But if you're attaching panels over a plywood substrate, such as on a shear panel wall, the strength is less of an issue. A couple more thoughts:

Butting two panels end to end on a stud can be a pain in the neck. You don't have much room on 1-1/2", you have to cut the panel, the stud often isn't quite vertical, and so on. My preferred technique is to butt the panels over a 4"-8" wide strip of 3/4" plywood running the length of the joint. This way you don't have to cut the panels or rely on the studs.

Even better is to put a 1/2" wide strip of 1/8" thick fiberboard at each edge of the plywood; this will force the butt edges in toward the wall, leaving you with a tapered seam. This is a little difficult to visualize in print; it's illustrated in Myron Ferguson's "Drywall: Professional Techniques for Walls and Ceilings".

Finally, goooooo slooooooow! Never hurry a drywall job, especially the taping. If you hurry and mess up a panel when installing it, you'll have to spend twice the time fixing it in the taping stage, and if you hurry and screw up the taping, you'll stare at it -- and hate yourself -- forever.
 
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