Drip Leg

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Old 12-19-05, 08:12 AM
remskm
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Drip Leg

How important is the installation of a "drip leg" in a gas line, in particular a propane gas line? In this case I'm asking about a line to water heater, but would it be important before all appliances (e.g., an oven)? Thanks.
 
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Old 12-19-05, 03:33 PM
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A "drip leg" is on the gas line at the meter, what you are looking at is a "sediment trap". This is placed in the branch line usually after the shut off valve to the appliance.

Great question for a couple of reasons.

LP gas is treated different from natural gas in some areas and not different in other areas. You should probably still have a sediment trap at the water heater as this appliance uses a fairly large amount of gas at a good flow through the line. Dirt, dust, small particles flowing through the line will fall into the sediment trap and hopefully not clog the gas valve.

It is not required (for natural gas) for an oven or stove. This type of appliance does not use gas in great quanities so it will not stir up particulate material laying in the line.

Drips and traps are not specifically listed, in modern plumbing codes, for LP applications. They were part of the plumbing code years ago, long before the International Codes, and were part of the Uniform Plumbing Code. LP was dropped, for the most part, in the late 80's and now falls under NFPA codes as the national model code. Your best bet would be to contact your LP supplier for your local code issues and construction.

Good luck with your project...
 
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Old 12-19-05, 05:32 PM
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Originally Posted by notuboo
Drips and traps are not specifically listed, in modern plumbing codes, for LP applications. They were part of the plumbing code years ago, long before the International Codes, and were part of the Uniform Plumbing Code. LP was dropped, for the most part, in the late 80's and now falls under NFPA codes as the national model code. Your best bet would be to contact your LP supplier for your local code issues and construction.

Good luck with your project...
As per NFPA 54 (National Fuel Code), sediment traps are required on "automatically fired appliances" such as water heaters and heating appliances. They are not required on ranges and dryers.
 
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