How do i remove the anode rod...?


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Old 09-06-06, 04:57 PM
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Wink How do i remove the anode rod...?

Greetings to all...I have a 50 gallon round hot water heater in my storage room, which is in the garage..The heater is about 8 yrs old and has never given any problem..but for the last few months it has gotten a rotten egg smell from the hot water. I got the heater from lowes and it has been a good one so far. I know the anode rod probably needs replacing, so i picked one up from the plumbing store..The only problem is getting the old one out..I can put a socket in the hole where the rod is at, but i can not turn it, even with a 18'' breaker bar..The socket seems to be just a little loose on the hex head, and i'm afraid of messing up something.Are most of the hex heads 1 1/8" , since thats the only size i could get to fit it. Or if i disconnect the hot and cold lines and the electrical, and then remove the top of the heater cover since it only has 5 or 6 little screws holding it on. Then maybe i could get a box-end wrench on it, and tap it with a 2 lb hammer. Sure would appreciate some help on this...Thanks...Oren
 
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Old 09-06-06, 05:32 PM
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Rotten egg smell is caused by bacteria in your water... good luck with that. You'll most likely need to chlorinate your water as a permanent solution, shock chlorinate your well if you want to keep them at bay for awhile, or flush the tank with chlorine bleach (then flush with water, to remove the diluted bleach) to kill the ones currently in your tank.

Not sure if whole house UV filtration is effective for sulfur-reducing or sulfur oxidizing bacteria, consult with a water treatment specialist.


Anyone who says the anode is the *cause* of the smell is ignorant at best, theres no way it can naturally break down into a sulfate (H2S) without the aid of the bacteria.
 
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Old 09-06-06, 05:39 PM
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Regarding removal of the anode, double the length of that breaker bar, and have a second person hold the tank so it will keep from turning.
 
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Old 09-07-06, 09:28 AM
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--> The socket seems to be just a little loose on the hex head, and i'm afraid of messing up something.Are most of the hex heads 1 1/8" , since thats the only size i could get to fit it. <--


I've never tried to change one but an article in Family Handyman says it should be 1 1/16"

I'd try and clean it up so you don't round it, then you'll never get it out.

Baldwin
 
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Old 09-09-06, 12:41 PM
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I used an impact wrench to take mine out. Worked like a champ.
 
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Old 09-18-08, 08:15 PM
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Old 09-18-08, 09:10 PM
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OLD POST

Look at the date... 2006
Also, not sure if promoting another DIY site is allowed.
 
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Old 11-14-08, 03:44 PM
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Arrow breaker bar take 2

The ultimate solution for me was a 36 inch breaker bar.. now heres my perilous story... I cracked it with the breaker bar after my landlord and his son tried, PLUS, in between they had ran an impact gun using a 150 psi compressor with no luck after the first breaker bar attempt failed. I had one guy hold the heater so it didnt move and mess up the plumbing. BE CAREFUL if you have a person holding the heater steady that they are not in the way if the bar slips or bounces back if you apply a lot of pressure and fail to break the thread loose! Also I would like to note that the circular sheet metal HW tank's top was offset just enough to interfere with the socket so it would go on, but not sit all the way down. We used channel locks to bend the edge of the metal up enough to get it out of the way of the socket, and then tapped it back down with a hammer after installing the new anode rod. Another thing that got in my way: the styrofoam and polyfill insulation on the top of the heater was blocking the top of the anode rod. Some of it felt hard like it might be something important(I didnt know anything when I started) but in my case it wasnt anything but insulation, and I cut it away with a buck knife. Also, I used a 1 and a sixteenth inch socket but the one with a lot of sides(star pattern?) was not a solid fit. Got a normal 6 or 8 sided socket and that worked. The first one was slipping so I had to wait until I got the typical one. I dont care how old the original post was, unless they recalled all hot water heaters with stubborn threads, this post is highly relevant and I addressed ALL of the issues that came up during my experience
 
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Old 11-14-08, 04:16 PM
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And now I understand why my buddy insisted on loosening the anode and pulling it out just far enough to wrap plumbers tape around the threads while we were installing my new water heater. When I replaced the anode last spring, it took a little muscle but not much. Looks like I owe him a six-pack for making that part of my handy homeowner life a bit easier.
 
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Old 11-14-08, 04:44 PM
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Smart buddy..now you (and the rest of us) are a little smarter too.
 
 

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