Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater

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Old 02-12-07, 04:34 PM
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Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater

Hi, first post here

I am looking to get a new hot water heater, tankless looks like a better alternative to a classic 40gal. I do not want to have to wait to get hot water though, i would like a response time close to that of a tank type heater.
3 or 4 gal. min. is fine, enough for a faucet and shower.

I am not nessesarly worried about saving enery.

I assume that most heaters can be set to kick in even when very small ammounts of water are being used. Correct?

What brand should i be looking at for the best quality? Better yet is there a specific model that has high ratings?

I can order from the net so anything is an option. Made in germany?
 
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Old 02-12-07, 08:30 PM
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If you mount the tankless in the same place as your existing tanked heater, you will have to wait just as long for hot water as the wait time is a factor of the distance the water must travel, not what's heating it.

The difference here is the tankless will deliver 100% hot water from the time it reaches the tap until the time you turn it off. Buy one with thermostatically controlled variable burners and it will stay the temp you set regardless of the flow rate.

Bosch makes a nice line of tankless with remote thermostats in the $1200 range.
 
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Old 02-13-07, 12:33 AM
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Understand that you may need to upsize the gas piping from the meter to the tankless heater. Tankless heaters use anywhere from two to five times as much instantaneous gas flow than do tank-type heaters.
 
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Old 02-13-07, 07:04 PM
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Check the Venting requirements as well - it may require a bigger pipe, or it may not be recommended to be vented into an unlined chimney.
 
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Old 02-14-07, 06:46 AM
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3 to 4 gallons a minute will need one of the larger units. Make sure when you look at specs you look at the temperature RISE. Some will advertise 5 gallons per minute at 70 rise, which this time of year would not get you a nice hot shower!
 
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Old 02-14-07, 11:29 AM
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Not having a "nice hot shower" from most tankless heaters during the winter months is a misconception.

I've got the Takagi tk-2 since 02' and have been very happy with it. As noted by 594tough, it's capable of 6.9 gpm but actually rated at 3.9 gpm due to cold incoming water temp. As far as the "nice hot shower" it will deliver 120 degree water continuously via standard 2.5 gpm shower head no matter what the demand is. However, the flow rate WILL decrease noticeably if, during the cold months, someone decides to fill the bath tub (4 gpm). We've had 2 showers going at once during the winter and can barely notice a slight pressure drop. One shower along with any appliance other than the bathtub is no problem even during the winter.

Hope this helps, Tony
 
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Old 04-12-07, 12:49 PM
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when i was in the market for water heaters, i was referred to this website by a friend www.tanklesswater.com
it was very helpful, delivery and advice came quick.
 
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Old 04-12-07, 06:46 PM
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We are on month 2 of a Rinnai and really enjoy it. What everyone else says is true. We chose the Rinnai because it is guaranteed to work at our elevation (8300 ft) without issues, a definite consideration if you live on high.

One issue - it makes a foghorn sound when there is large demand, the water heater hasn't been used in awhile (ie first thing in the morning), and it's below about 30 degrees outside. We notice it only at the tub faucet (when turned on full bore), nothing else conjures up the noise and it only lasts about 2 seconds. Plumber is researching resolution of the problem.
 
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