Piping for LP water heater


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Old 10-04-07, 12:30 PM
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Piping for LP water heater

I am replacing my propane water heater with a new one soon. Currently, I have 1/2" black iron pipe that is feeding LP directly into the water heater. There is currently no shut off valve in that gas line.

I am going to add a shutoff valve in this line and have a couple of questions. When putting in a ground joint union in the pipe, that needs to go after the shutoff correct? Also, where the ground joint union comes together, you do not use any tape or thread joint compound within that union correct?

I just want to make sure before I start my project.

Thank you.
 
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Old 10-04-07, 06:46 PM
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bkesting,

You need a shut off valve and a flexible supply line. No union is involved.

On the 1/2" pipe, install a shut off valve with a flared outlet. Tape or dope the threads where the valve joins with the pipe (the inlet side). DO NOT tape or dope the flared side.

On the gas valve of the WH, install a pipe-to-flare adapter. Tape or dope only the threaded end, NOT the flared end. Between that adapter and the shut off valve, install a flexible supply line. No tape or dope is needed.
 
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Old 10-04-07, 09:17 PM
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The guy told me at my hardware store that it would be best to keep a rigid line to feed into my water heater as I have now. Also, my current setup has the 1/2" line coming straight down from the ceiling into a T-fitting. The pipe then branches off one way to the water heater and the other branch goes straight down into a short capped-off piece of pipe as a sediment trap (or called a drip leg).

I was under the impression that this drip leg/sediment trap is required by code. If I go with the flex line from the shutoff valve to the water heater, wouldn't that eliminate the drip leg?
 
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Old 10-05-07, 12:31 AM
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if you decide to go with the flexible connector you should still use the drip leg. just remove the section of pipe leaving the tee, not the one with the cap on it. replace that piece with a small 1/2" nipple, then the shut-off valve, then the flex line, then the pipe x flare adapter into the heater. when you tighten the adapter into the gas valve on the new heater be carefull no to split the gas valve. it doesn't have to be super tight and the gas valve is made of soft metal. so take it easy and check it with soapy water for leaks when you're done.





paul
 
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Old 10-05-07, 07:47 PM
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bkesting,

Where I'm at, you couldn't hard pipe the gas to the WH. There HAS to be a flexible line between the shut off valve and the WH.
 
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Old 10-05-07, 08:24 PM
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Wink

Ill say with many many years working with LP. I know of no where . That calls for that drip leg on LP. Only on NG. Like said go flare to copper to flare to the water tank. With no shutoff valve. We always turn the LP off at the tank. When done make sure and check the W/C of the LP gas make sure all gas burners in the home are on ,should be a good 11"
 
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Old 01-26-08, 11:20 AM
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Question Help with LP gas line

Just signed up to this forum and not sure if I am posting this in the right place, but....please help
I am a life-long DIY'er and generally do ALL my own home improvement/building/etc. I have found my quality of work and care of the job far superior to the "professionals" I have encountered. Not knocking the truly pro tradesmen, wish there were more out there.

to the point...I renovated our two-car garage into a family room this past year. I purchased a wall mounted LP GAS heater (ventless) to heat the room. (called in a pro for a heat system first and got a $4500 quote - OUCH)

I have run iron pipe (water and gas) lines before, have the skills but lack the knowlede on some specifics.
My home is heated with LP gas. The line coming in the house is 1/2" flexible copper (didn't know you could do this)

It runs directly to the current LP furnace (heats the house), with one tee (1/2" x 1/2" x 3/8") off to the water heater (3/8" flex copper line).

I had planned on running 1/2" iron pipe to this tee and joining in there. (maybe adding a tee to the tee and moving on with my new line?)
My question is how do I connect to the the copper? After reading many postings on similar topics, should I
just run flex pipe? Can I?
I have to go about a 30 l.f. with several turns, etc. Access is difficult, so probably will be removing siding and going through wall joists in outside walls.
The copper tee is in the basement with drop ceiling so access there is pretty easy.
I am assuming this tee has flared fittings? looks like a compression fitting. Can I buy a fitting to tee off the existing tee to convert to i.p. threads? Should I just run a copper line? Frankly, the copper line idea scares me.
I asked at Home Cheapo, but....enough said.
Tried Noland (pro plumbing/HVAC supply) this morning, but they actually take Saturdays off.

Sorry for the long-winded "question". Please help - I would like to actually heat the room before spring.
 
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Old 01-26-08, 05:04 PM
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Ahhh, where to start.....

First, I would check local code whether or not to use a flex line at the water heater. Some jurisdictions you have to, some you can't. If you chose to use a union, put it inline after the shut off valve. I don't recommend using tape at all, but if you do, use yellow. White teflon tape is not approved for gas.

On the following I am providing information that is stated in NFPA 54, National Fuel Code. Once again, authority having jurisdiction can over ride.

Shut off valves are required on ALL gas appliances within 6 feet of said appliance. The exception is if there is a manifold within 50 feet where each line has it's own shut off. (Section 9.6.4)

Sediment traps are required on gas appliances regardless of NG or LP. The only appliances that are not required to have a sediment trap are ranges, dryers, illuminating devices or fireplaces. (Section 9.6.7)
 
 

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