Temp Pressure Relief Valve Leaking


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Old 11-08-07, 10:59 AM
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Temp Pressure Relief Valve Leaking

I have a problem with my pressure relief valve leaking periodically. I have my temp turned down and have replaced the valve once already. I have a feeling that the pressure coming into the house is causing the problem, but not sure. I've tried to adjust the pressure back flow regulator on the incoming main from the street, but haven't had much luck. Not sure which direction to turn the screw on the valve, have tried both ways, however, it seems that tigtening the screw has helped a little. I also have a backflow tank on top of the water heater. Does anyone have any thoughts about this problem? It's driving me crazy.
Thanks,
Doug
 
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Old 11-08-07, 03:29 PM
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First, buy a pressure valve, available at home/hardware stores for just a few $$$, and see what the pressure actually is. Above 70PSI is often a problem with fixtures. Below that and the problem is in the heater, not in the pressure.
 
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Old 11-08-07, 04:25 PM
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Thanks for the advice. I'll give that a try.
 
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Old 11-09-07, 11:06 AM
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Do you have an expansion tank on the cold feed?
 
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Old 11-19-07, 12:07 PM
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Red face i have the same problem

hey guys,

i seem to have the same problem.....

my pressure release valve opened up last year (during the opening kickoff of the super bowl....damn I missed Hester's TD ) and since then i had no problem....i didnt really replace anything

however, over this weekend, the valve opened up twice. i have no idea what the problem might be....

any help is appreciated.
 
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Old 11-20-07, 04:26 PM
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The most common reason is excessive pressure. Do you have a pressure reducing valve (PRV) on your incoming water line? If yes, then do you also have an expansion tank on the cold water line to the water heater? If no, then you need one.

If yes to both of the above questions then you may have a problem with the PRV or you may have a defective expansion tank.
 
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Old 11-20-07, 04:31 PM
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i dont think i have an expansion tank. The model of my gas water heater is A.O. Smith FSG 50 216. The cold pipe running into the heater has a valve. i tried turning it both ways and it didnt seem to matter. i had this problem last year and then for a year everything was ok. now all of a sudden, its back.
 
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Old 11-20-07, 10:08 PM
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The first thing to do is to go to your local Home Depot (or such) and buy a water pressure gauge. They are made by Watts (and others) and have a connection that allows it to be screwed to a regular garden hose faucet. They also have a manually reset hand that will record the highest pressure reached. It will cost about ten dollars.

I suggest that you connect this gauge to the hot water connection for your clothes washer and let it set with the faucet on over night. Note the highest reading on the gauge and what the gauge is reading right after some water is used. If the highest pressure is considerably higher than the reading right after using some water then you probably need an expansion tank as the pressure rise is most likely due to heating of a large quantity of water with no other water usage.

If the pressure after using some water is about the same as the highest pressure achieved in 24 hours and this highest pressure is not over about 80 to 85 psi then I suggest that you change the T&P valve on the water heater.

If your pressure is always higher than about 85 psi then you would benefit from installing a pressure reducing valve on your main incoming water supply.
 
 

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