Floor drain question??


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Old 02-12-08, 08:25 PM
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Floor drain question??

I'm installing a new water heater at my mothers house and just realized that she has no floor drain in sight! The unit in place now has no place to drain in case of failure at all! She does have a small black hose the size of a garden hose coming out of the concrete floor that the AC unit and humidifier drain into but it doesn't look like it could handle the flow of a hot water heater draining.

My question is.. What should I do? Does she need the new water heater connected to a drain to meet code or can I install the new unit like the old and not worry about? Or lastly, should I plumb it into that small drainage hose in the floor that already has the ac and humidifier draining into it?

Any advise would be appreciated.

Thanks!!
 
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Old 02-13-08, 04:10 AM
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Codes differ from location to location. Technically the T&P valve must be vented to within a few inches of the floor. This is to keep extremely hot water from blasting across a room and burning someone during a failure. It is always best to have them drain into a floor drain or out to the atmosphere. It cannot go uphill. I think posting a picture of the drain you have on a site such as photobucket.com and giving us the urls or posting the HTML code to your reply would help us give you good information. Usually the two cannot be hooked together, but seeing what you have may give us some alternative methods.
 
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Old 02-13-08, 10:40 AM
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I'm not able to take a picture right now but even if I could it wouldnt show anything useful. The small black hose coming out of the concrete already has the humidifier and the ac connected to it and is way to small to handle the exhaust water a water heater. For the sake of argument lets just say I have no drainage at all near the water heater.... What would be the best solution in that case?

Thanks!
 
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Old 02-13-08, 11:14 AM
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Wink

A lot of codes call for the P/T valve to be piped to the outside. With steel or copper pipe no PVC. Check with code there is best to do.
 
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Old 02-13-08, 04:44 PM
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I would leave the pipe exposed. If it is connected to another pipe and drains somewhere else, how will you know if a problem exists?
 
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Old 02-13-08, 07:54 PM
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What I was thinking as a fix is to install a tank pan and one of those flood stop systems that shuts the water and gas off if any water is detected in the pan. Other then doing something like that there is no easy fix. It really seems like the only solution at this time.
 
 

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