what's that on top of my heater?


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Old 08-01-08, 07:33 PM
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Question what's that on top of my heater?

It is Giant 152ETE-3F7M
Just installed it myself (2-3 hours ago).
I see a water on top of anode coming up slowly within that blue plastic "cup".

Water should not be there, correct?

As about the rest - the heater works fine so far.

Thanks


 
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Old 08-01-08, 10:56 PM
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Thumbs down

Nice job of soldering on that T&P valve outlet piping. Too bad it's all WRONG!

You CANNOT reduce the size of the discharge piping from the T&P safety valve and neither can you have the piping travel in an upward direction.
 
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Old 08-02-08, 04:28 AM
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Exclamation

When did the water get there? Was it when you changed the heater, from the cut pipes. Is it still leaking into that cup? Check very closely all your connections on the heater, including the relief valve. If you find no leaks, I would replace that water heater under warranty immediately.

What furd has said about the relief valve like is 100% correct and should be fixed immediately. ANYTHING that restricts the flow on a relief valve is creating a potential BOMB. A relief valve is an EMERGENCY device for your protection and should be piped according to manufacturers specs, NO LESS.
 
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Old 08-02-08, 05:58 AM
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easy

easy guys, do not judge that fast

my job was just to replace the old leaking tank with new one (identical model), so ALL original installation practices/piping remain as they were done in 1992 by constructors of the building (condo). Cheap construction, or they just do not know better...

Anyway, so you are saying that no water in that "cup" should appear under any circumstances?
I already sponged it once (thinking it got there from outside), but it appeard slowly again. But I have an impression that its level kinda stabilized. For the night it closed the water valve off (and power) though, just to be safe

Replacing by warranty sounds like a headache...
Can it be fixed somehow else? This is the anode entry, right? So maybe I just fix if I were replacing the anode?

thank you
 
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Old 08-02-08, 11:52 AM
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It could be from the anode rod area. If it is possible to remove just the cover on top, you would be able to figure out better where the leak is coming from.

I wasn't judging you, Just stating the facts and that the safety issue should be fixed immediately.
 
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Old 08-02-08, 11:25 PM
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Originally Posted by Sergey
easy guys, do not judge that fast

my job was just to replace the old leaking tank with new one (identical model), so ALL original installation practices/piping remain as they were done in 1992 by constructors of the building (condo). Cheap construction, or they just do not know better...
Just because that is the way it was before doesn't mean it's right. Regardless how it was before, you were the one to install this one. Therefore if something catastrophic were to go wrong with the heater you are liable. Yes, the way this is hooked up can cause catastrophic results.
 
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Old 08-03-08, 03:23 AM
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Result of TPRV failure on a 5 gallon water heater:



- Avon High School Hot Water Heater Explosion – Final Report

With that upturn from the TPRV, the "minor leakage" that can be evidence of a detective valve might not be noticed.
 
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Old 08-03-08, 04:57 AM
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Excellent article.

Hopefully lots of people will read it and understand the importance of the relief valve and its related piping.

I have only had the chance to see staged tests done, where extreme conditions were applied to cause the water heater to explode. Here is one in real life.


Thanks again Michael
 
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Old 08-03-08, 07:14 AM
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If really does happen, I have a collection of water heater explosion reports I link to from our inspection reports to suggest why defective TPRVs and plumbing need to be taken seriously. Here's the result of a recent explosion of a full size residential unit:



House Explosion Caused by Faulty Water Heater
 
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Old 08-03-08, 08:27 AM
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Sergy,
I hope you got the help you needed here. If not ask for more.

We needed you and all others to understand the importance of TPRV's (Temperature Pressure Relief Valves) and the piping after them. Hopefully others will learn from this post.

Once again, thank you Michael
 
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Old 08-03-08, 08:58 AM
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You could try tightening the anode (for residential units it's generally 11/16 inch, you may need a deep socket), and if it appears to be tight, back it off, (re)tape it with Teflon, and then re tighten it to see if that stops the leak - make sure the water in the heater is at room temp first, and open the drain to insure it not under pressure.
 
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Old 08-03-08, 08:59 AM
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does not impress

yeah, go, scare me with those articles One of my friends told me even more horrible story: in Toronto a water heater exploded, broke through 3 stories up, went out of roof and landed a hundred meters away on a parking lot, damaging a car...

Ok, ok, now I have to have more fun with my condo: break the wall and fix that damn piping issue (doom on Quebec constructors)

And about the water at the anode top: that night I turned the heater off as well as its water intake. In the morning there was much less water in the "cup". I turned the heater back on, it ran for a day and the water disappeared by itself (possibly evaporated because the metal part is always hot)...

So, now the heater runs normally, dry everywhere.

BTW, when I had just started the heater after the replacement and water became hot, I checked its connected pipes and both were hot, while normally, the incoming one is cold and output one is hot... Maybe that a clue?...

Anyway, I'll hold with that "cup" water problem as far as it has gone (hopefully it's not another timing bomb), and will focus on fixing the relief piping... (my wife will be happy with that mess in our laundry room again)

Thank you all for your help. I never realized that water tank is THAT sophisticated matter and maybe significant source of danger...
 
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Old 08-03-08, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Michael Thomas
You could try tightening the anode (for residential units it's generally 11/16 inch, you may need a deep socket), and if it appears to be tight, back it off, (re)tape it with Teflon, and then re tighten it to see if that stops the leak - make sure the water in the heater is at room temp first, and open the drain to insure it not under pressure.
yes, that's what comes to my mind first... I just thought how normal is that to have water there. Now I know it is NOT normal in any way

Funny enough, additionally to the wrong piping for the relief valve, the pipe is going just on top of the anode hole (see the photo below), so imaging how much fun you'll have if you'd need to replace the anode or just fix the leak as it's in my case...

I can't believe those people build houses for living.


P.S. - the only idea I have, maybe originally it was done OK, but for another, maybe bigger tank (60gal). Then later somebody has replaced it with smaller one, that's why. The only problem in this theory is, the building is from 1992. And my tank was from the same year... so no replacement was done. Unless, they planned to install bigger tanks and did the piping ahead, but ended up with smaller tanks and adjusted piping on the fly. Whatever.

I wonder if I can sue constructing company for that pipe as a potential well known (for professionals) fatal error?!
 

Last edited by Sergey; 08-03-08 at 10:03 AM. Reason: P.S. and typos
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Old 08-03-08, 07:25 PM
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It could be a leak from one of the other fittings that seeps over through the insulation on the top. What is that bushing or extension on the TP? The temperature prope has to reach down all the way into the tank to be completely effective.

I realize you have already been chastised about this job! Let me add more: Almost anywhere in the US requires that a water heater replacement be done with a permit, EVEN if the homeowner does it himself. The accompanying inspection would fail the TP connection, so we are not being unreasonable. This is something which REALLY must be fixed.
 
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Old 08-04-08, 04:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Sergey
Funny enough, additionally to the wrong piping for the relief valve, the pipe is going just on top of the anode hole (see the photo below), so imaging how much fun you'll have if you'd need to replace the anode or just fix the leak as it's in my case...
They make flexible anodes for such situations - though that one is really tight, and you still might not make it.

 

Last edited by Michael Thomas; 08-04-08 at 05:13 AM.
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Old 08-04-08, 08:28 PM
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The house shown with the front blown out looks like it was made from paper machet. If I ever have to money to buy a house, it will be brick.
 
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Old 08-05-08, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Pulpo
The house shown with the front blown out looks like it was made from paper machet. If I ever have to money to buy a house, it will be brick.
Do you think brick will stand up to a water heater letting go like that??? If you do you are sadly mistaken. The first picture shows concrete block walls blown out by a point of use water heater (5 gallons). Thats about a 10th the size of a standard residential water heater.
 
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Old 08-09-08, 12:24 AM
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Myself I am electrician by trade { both USA and French } and I allready see few electric waterheater tank blow up and some were pretty nasty one and it don't take much to get them blow up in case the T&P valve stuck due majorty of the homeowner don't bother to " shake " the valve so that way it will not be sticky or stuck.

Most common mode of failure on electric waterheaters

Bad thermosat

Bad heating element

Bad T&P valve

and lack of " blowdown " sequice as well what it mean that from time to time open up the drain valve and spit out few gallons of hot water to get the gunk like seidment , rust etc out something like that.

I have oil fired waterheater and I do blowdown every few months to keep bottom of my tank clean { yeah this model have hand port so i can able look inside of it and it is clean }


Let me add one more thing for all readers anytime you replace the electric waterheaters.,,

If the waterheater is not in sight of breaker box it must have a disconnect switch next to the waterheater. [ Per NEC codes requirement and I am pretty sure the CEC { Candana Electrical Code is simuair to this one as well }

A common A/C pullout switch will serve this purpose pretty good

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 08-10-08, 12:49 PM
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Here one good example of water heater blow up you will see how high and how fast it will move.

waterheater blast

here other part also

tank blow up


Both are good example how it react when they blow up.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 08-10-08, 01:07 PM
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Hey Frenchy, I've seen that 2nd on on television before.

Hopefully a lot of other people did too.

 
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Old 08-15-08, 06:58 AM
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Latest water heater explosion: water heater ended up a block away, garage door ended up on roof across street:



http://gmy.news.yahoo.com/v/9293239
 
 

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