Sound of running water from Heater.


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Old 03-25-09, 11:55 AM
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Sound of running water from Heater.

Hi Folks:

My water heater is turned off most of the time yet I continue to hear the sound of running water from it.

Yesterday I climbed into the back of the closet to get a look.
It is mounted on a pedestal that also serves as a drip tray of sorts. That tray is about 3/4 full of water, but does not seem to get any fuller.

I think I turned off the water feed line to the heater. It is the only valve to turn, but the sound continues.

My guess is that the heater is leaking somewhere, the tray has a drain, and I'm letting money literally go down the drain.

I plan on cleaning out the closet entirely, sucking the water out of the tray, and start looking for the source of the leak.

What I don't understand is why after turning off the feed the sound continues.

Any suggestions, ideas are greatly appreciated.

CMD
 
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Old 03-25-09, 12:02 PM
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Just like a leak in a pitcher you are filling...even turning off the water it will contine to leak.
And it could be the valve is not completely shutting off.

You're on the right track..be prepared for a new WH.
 
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Old 03-25-09, 12:14 PM
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Thanks:

You pretty much confirmed my own suspicions. Especially about the valve not being fully closed.

Ah well. Time to tackle the task.

Ain't home ownership great?

CMD
 
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Old 03-25-09, 12:35 PM
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Yep..gotta love it. Still better than dealing with a landlord and their cheap outs.

Relax all you rental property owners...I'm not talking about ALL of you....lol
 
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Old 03-26-09, 01:02 PM
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Got the new heater today. Still don't know exactly where the leak in the old one is, but there are rust stains on the outside of the heater. That can't be a good sign.

Draining the old one now, and plan on installing the new one tonight.

Question. I bought the braided steel(?) hoses that supposedly just slip over the pipe, and seal completely. No threading, no soldering. Nothing.

Anyone have experience with these?

Amazingly I only forgot to buy one item at HD. A hose for the relief valve. One more trip. Oh. Well.

CMD
 
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Old 03-26-09, 01:27 PM
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Don't know about the hoses..never seen that. Most kits may have compression fittings, then the hoses attach to those. Again, never seen them.

Did you get new dielectric nipples for the inlet and outlet?

Just a bit of advise..I never start a plumbing project at night. If you need something..you are pretty much hosed if a big box doesn't have what you need, since all the plumbing and hardware stores will be closed.
 
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Old 03-26-09, 09:31 PM
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cdmiles,

If you are talking about the braided stainless steel supply lines, they are a far sight better than the corrigated copper versions.

A "hose" for the T&P valve?? NO!! NO!! NO!! THAT has to be a solid metal pipe, and it has to end within 6" of the floor or grade if it's terminated outside. (An NO portion of the run can run uphill!)
 
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Old 03-27-09, 08:49 PM
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All Done:

Getting the old heater out and the new heater in were the toughest part of the job, and they were not too bad.

Those steel braided hoses are called "shark bites", and they work just as advertised. I even bought a shark bite valve for the feed line, and after I slipped it over the pipe I turned on the main. No leaks. Not a one. I'm afraid your warning about not using one for the pressure relief valve is a bit too late.

CMD
 
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Old 03-27-09, 09:09 PM
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Dielectric nipples?

Would that be the wire running from the cold inlet to the hot outlet?

If so the answer is no.

CMD
 
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Old 03-28-09, 06:50 AM
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Dialectric nipples are threaded "stubs" installed in the top of the WH and help prevent galvanic corrosion. They look pretty much like a regular pipe nipple about 3" long, but have a plastic insert through the middle. It may have come with the WH or may have been with the hoses if you bought a kit. The better ones are normally not available at HD or Lowes, but the ones they have will work.

Now I know the type of hoses you have...supposed to be pretty good, esp for an exposed location like you are using them for. Didn't know they made hoses, thought it was just fittings.

You really should re-do the T&P pipe...if not right away, sometime soon. How is it piped? To the outside or into the pan? I don't know why it requires solid pipe, but thats all I've ever seen.
 
 

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