I have a Richmond elec water heater, can I replace anode rod myself?


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Old 08-25-10, 04:56 AM
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I have a Richmond elec water heater, can I replace anode rod myself?

I have a Richmond electric water heater, can I replace anode rod myself? 6E50-2 is the model. I've heard some anode rods are hard to replace and some aren't. Is this Richmond water heater one that's hard to replace the anode on? I am good at instructions but not at 'winging it', so if it's very complex I won't be able to do it. I read that it's vital to replace the anode, but is it really? Or only if you have a water softener or something? Thanks in advance!
 
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Old 08-25-10, 08:25 AM
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As to the "vital" part....I've never replaced one..ever. I know how, just never did. I think it probably depends greatly on your water chemistry, but an expert would have to explain why.

Gas WH at my last house was 16 y/o when I moved. I'd flush it maybe once a year...if I remembered...never had a problem.

Anyway...could you post the serial number of the WH..that will tell us age.
 
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Old 08-25-10, 09:00 AM
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I had gas water heaters installed at my home in 1987.

In 1991 I replaced the anode rod in the water heater at my home---- it was significantly deteriorated

I just replaced it again --- it was significantly deteriorated.

I just replaced the water heater at my rental, which was leaking from an internal hole. The anode on it had never been replaced.

I pulled the anode to check the condition --- there was about a 1/2" of steel wire extending from the top of the anode plug, the rest was gone.

I'd start by pulling and checking the condition of the anode rod each five years, and replacing it if condition warrents it.
 
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Old 08-26-10, 04:36 AM
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The year is 2004 so it's not very old. If I get generalize, It sounds like flushing is more important than replacing the rod?
 
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Old 08-26-10, 06:16 PM
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If you want long life from the tank, plan to do the maintenance on it.


At that age, I'd flush the tank to see if you have cruf building up, and if so how much. Use that as a guide for how often to flush the tank in the future.

Pull the anode rod and inspect it for the same reason. If it's lightly to moderately corroded, check it again in five years. If it's heavily corroded, replace it now and inspect it again in five years.

You need a 1 1/16" socket to remove the anode rod ---- and often either an impact wrench or a picec of pipe on the end of your wrench to give you more leverage to get it out.

You need a way to prevent the tank from turning when you are torqueing it, too.

When installing an anode rod, don't torque it in more than the minimum needed to prevent leakage.
 
 

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