Anode in the hotwater output


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Old 11-08-10, 12:51 PM
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Anode in the hotwater output

I have a Bradford white thats 10 years old and figured its time to check the Anode. To my surprise its incorporated into Hot water line output which would be real pain to remove since its soldered in. Why in world would they build it this way? I thought it would be at top as separate unit, unscrew, check and put back! They must not want you to check so it rust out! I would not buy a B/W for this reason unless they are all like this now.

Thx
 
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Old 11-08-10, 03:57 PM
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To my surprise its incorporated into Hot water line output which would be real pain to remove since its soldered in.
There are two basic types of anode rods installed by OEMs. One type has a separate port installed on top of water heater, and usually can be identified by a hex-head nut . . . if the sacrificial metal is aluminum, the hex-head will be flat on top; if itís magnesium, it will have a small bubble at center of hex-head. The other type is installed in the hot water port, and is commonly referred to as an outlet anode or combo anode. My knowledge is limited to those Iíve replaced over the years in various homes. Iíve never encountered an anode rod that was soldered into the port by a manufacturer. I suspect youíre referring to the plumbing connection made by the installer, and if thatís the case, it simply reflects an installer not thinking through the need to change-out the anode rod and not using a connection that doesnít have to be soldered so that the rod can be periodically replaced easily.

There is a lot of useful information about water heaters and anode rods at this website Sacrificial Anodes: What keeps water heaters from rusting out. There is so much info that you may need to browse various links . . . because of being limited on time, I could not find a page Iíve referenced before that shows what plumbing connections to use so that replaceable parts such as an anode rod, tp relief valve, etc. can be easily replaced w/o needing to solder or calling out a plumber. Iíve wanted to use thicker and longer anode rods to give added protection in the past, and Iíve only found those available through this website. If you have any questions or need technical info, Iíve found Randy to quickly respond to Emails and the forum is another useful tool for gathering info from water heater/plumbing professionals.
 
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Old 11-08-10, 05:03 PM
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Thx for reply. That link is really good with all that info. The water heater was already installed when i bought house. I will make sure to put in correct lines if i buy similar heater, but i think it would still be better to have separate port for anode. It just does not make sense to incorporate it into hot water line, unless there is a good reason to do this.
 
 

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