drip leg

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  #1  
Old 01-29-11, 04:31 PM
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drip leg

Inspector said I need a "drip leg" on my water heater.
What is a drip leg?
What does it do?
 
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Old 01-29-11, 05:17 PM
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Where the gas line comes in to the water heater, before it goes to the control valve there must be a drip leg. It is formed by placing a tee in the black pipe and a short 4" or so nipple (capped) out the bottom of the tee, and the gas out the side to the valve. It collects moisture and stuff that you don't want in the burner or control valve. See: How to install a drip leg in a gas powered hot water heater | Video Wonder How To, then attach your gas inlet line to the top of the tee as shown.
 
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Old 02-03-11, 03:14 AM
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Thanks Chandler for all your help!
So, does my gas furnace need a drip leg too? What about my gas stove?
Also, I've never replaced any gas lines before, and I'm thinking, how do you replace pieces in the middle of a run? I mean, is there some of the threaded ends that are reverse threads, or do I have to tear the line apart all the way to the end, then replace the "in-between" piece, teflon everything all the way to the end again, or is there a way to just take out the one piece?
 
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Old 02-03-11, 03:33 AM
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All gas connections at appliances should have a drip leg that is accessible. Connecting or replacing pipe is done with unions. It allows complete installation of pipe or removal for maintenance.
 
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Old 02-03-11, 05:54 PM
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Thanks again Chandler! Gee, maybe this is why my gas appliances aren't working correctly! No drip legs at all in the house.
 
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Old 02-04-11, 12:18 AM
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Yes, drip legs are recommended.

If you have water get in your piping system, or rust, dust, grit or other debris, there is a chance the junk will fall into the drip leg rather than be carried into the gas valve where it might cause problems.

But the risk of that happening is low in most areas.

Unless you want to do this task yourself and feel you have the skill to do it, I'd wait until you have a gas repairman out to service your equipment and have the job done then.

And frankly, lots of equipment is installed these days without drip legs, just as yours was. It's rare for such equipment to actually have a problem that would have been prevented by a drip leg.
 
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Old 02-05-11, 09:11 AM
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Agree with Seattle

I rarely see drip legs on gas ranges. I just always make sure that the gas flex line has a big downward bow in it. It seems to me that any moisture or sediment would collect there.
 
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