Rust in water heat?


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Old 01-26-12, 08:19 AM
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Rust in water heat?

We bought a house that has sat empty for two years, it was a foreclosure house. There was some frozen water lines so I repaired them and put the gas water heater back in place and turned the water on. I knew there would be some rust and crud in it. I ran it for quite a while last nigh and it cleared up some.

My question is will it every completely clear up or will I have to deal with it or replace the water heater?

Bobg
 
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Old 01-26-12, 10:22 AM
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It should clear up mostly with use but it will probably continue. After all, something is rusting away and it won't stop on it's own. It could be steel/iron pipes or fittings rusting in which case they will eventually rust through and leak. It could be the water heater's tank rusting which will eventually leak and need replacing. If you are on city water there might be a slim chance that the rust was carried in from the city's lines but I'm betting it's coming from inside the house or the supply line leading to the house.

If the water heater is located where a leak will cause damage to the rest of the house I'd consider replacing it to save an even larger repair expense in the future. If it's in an unfinished basement where it will just get the floor wet with no real damage I'd let it go until something leaks.
 
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Old 01-26-12, 10:41 AM
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Hi Pilot Dane,

I ran the water for about 15 minutes last night, but I'm sure that wasn't enough to clear out the tank. I'm going to turn it on and run it for quite a while tonight while working on the house. I've had the cold water on for a few days and it didn't have any rust in it, so I'm assuming it's in the water heater itself.

Bobg
 
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Old 01-26-12, 01:20 PM
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You can also try flushing the tank by opening the valve at the bottom of the tank. Quite often they clog so I shove a plastic wire tie into the valve to clear the debris. If it's really sedimented-up I turn off the water to the heater and unscrew the drain valve. Then crack the supply valve open enough to get a little water pressure to flush the tank.

As long as you are getting sediment do not run a dishwasher or clothes washer. The sediment can clog their infeed strainers and valves, causing a real headache.
 
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Old 01-26-12, 01:29 PM
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I thought about draining from the bottom and I'll try that also. I had to take off all the faucet spot strainers and clean them out because of the crud. It may clean out pretty good by the bottom valve, we have in excess of 100 pounds of pressure. Been thinking of installing a pressure reducer.

Bobg
 
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Old 01-26-12, 01:47 PM
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I would say imstall a PRV absolutly.

Then you need a expansion tank added.

I would of sanitized the whole plumbing system with bleach.

For $350 bucks I would have replaced the heater.

Mike NJ
 
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Old 01-27-12, 09:24 AM
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I thought about buying a new water heater, but the price is around $500. I need one with a power vent so that drives the price up.

Lawrosa I do have a small expansion tank already on it, capacity looks to be about three gallons.

On another subject I now realize that I must have registered under my unioncreek name a long time ago.

Bobg
 
 

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