Condensation Around Water Heater


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Old 03-19-12, 11:41 AM
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Condensation Around Water Heater

Hello-

I noticed some water near my water heater last night. I looked at it again today around noon and felt around the heater and didn't feel anything "wet". I did notice that there was cooler water in the photo below, which was directly above where the water was (there wasn't a pool of water or anything, just where water had been sitting on the cement). Photo of area where I felt the water.

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Couple of things for you. we've basically gone from 30 degree temps to 70's (and it hit 80 yesterday), wondering if that could be the cause of the condensation and we were gone over the weekend so no water was used at all, so, could this be a product of coming home and getting things going again with the water heater.

Any cause for concern?

Any advice would be great! Thanks!

Scott
 
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Old 03-19-12, 12:06 PM
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Your picture is of the drain valve on your water heater. I think these things cost the manufacturer all of 15 cents and they are, at best, lousy. If you don't want to install a decent valve then simply go to the homecenter and in the garden department you will find a cap that will screw on the end of a garden hose. The drain valve is the same thread. Be sure to use a gasket, or washer, inside the cap.
 
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Old 03-19-12, 12:13 PM
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Furd- Thanks for the response. I am far from a handy man when it comes to this, so what all should I be looking for (any link of something similar to what I should get). Also, is this a problem if i just "let it be". We've lived in the house five years and I have never noticed anything before.... is this just a one time thing? Sorry for so many questions.
 
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Old 03-19-12, 12:23 PM
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I prefer the brass hose caps but they also come in plastic. Be sure it has the gasket (black ring in the photo) inside.


(Image courtesy of acehose.com)

You can try turning the outside of the valve in a clockwise motion to see if it is just not completely closed. Turn it firmly but not so hard as to break it.
 
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Old 03-19-12, 12:33 PM
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Thanks! I'll give it a turn tonight to see if it doesn't help solve the problem, if not, i'll grab a gasket cover. much appreciated.

long term, you don't see any cause for concern?
 
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Old 03-19-12, 12:42 PM
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Long term you will eventually need to replace the water heater, their life is somewhere between 8 and 20 years with gas-fired water heaters tending to crap out (that's a professional term, ) sooner than electric models. Regular flushing (once or twice a year depending on water quality) will generally help prolong the life of the heater. Flushing instructions are located at the top of this category if I remember correctly.

Otherwise, no problem in using the cap on the end of the valve.
 
 

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