Should I insulate the pipes coming into/out of our water heater????


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Old 12-11-12, 05:31 PM
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Should I insulate the pipes coming into/out of our water heater????

Should any of the pipes shown in the photos (below) be covered with insulated foam? The house is located in Texas, and it does get below freezing on occasion. The odd-shaped pipes coming out the top appear to be made of copper.

Also, this water heater was enclosed by two wood panels (as seen in the pic). We're planning on selling the house soon. I don't think it should be enclosed like this. Will this cause headaches for us when a buyer's inspector comes in to do their inspection? Should we take down the panels?


Water Heater Photos by hikerguy1 | Photobucket

thanks,

Andy
 
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Old 12-11-12, 06:19 PM
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Gas Hot Water Heater in an enclosed closet with no fresh air source? Did I see that right? Pipes meant nothing to me in the pictures, but the lack of fresh air to the heater did. At the vary least, make sure the clearances are correct on the heater and cut in some fresh air vents into the sides of the closet.
 
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Old 12-11-12, 06:35 PM
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Any gas burning appliance requires space around it for combustion air. The manual states how much space is actually required, but I would definitely take them down... one less thing for the prospective buyers to complain about.

The hot water pipe leading out of the water heater should be insulated to save some money, but it doesn't have to be. Because of the flexible copper pipes, I wouldn't bother trying to insulate it. I'm not sure if it would really be worth it.
 
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Old 12-13-12, 05:53 PM
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There is a vent coming out the top and going outside.: Is that enough? Having it enclosed like that didn't look right to me. When my wife told me it was in that enclosure I was quite surprised. I thought the wood panels were there just to hang stuff on lol. Guess I have some work to do.
 
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Old 12-13-12, 06:26 PM
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There is a vent coming out the top and going outside
That is the hot exhaust vent. That steady stream of exhaust needs to be replaced by fresh air into that "closet."

At the very least cut louvers in the lower portion of those panels. At least one in each panel and more ideally would be one top and bottom of both panels.
 
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Old 12-14-12, 03:05 AM
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The one thing I can see is the use of two dissimilar materials in pipes. Using copper and cast iron may throw a flag up at inspection time. It can be made to look good and orderly with all copper fittings and pipes/cut off valves. Not totally necessary, but you asked.

Also, is the shower functional? I see a shower ear laying loose near the floor that indicates it may not be. Could also be a flag item.
 
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Old 12-22-12, 01:08 PM
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Thanks for all the advice. I may just end up removing the panels all together. We probably won't be ready for an inspector to look over the house for a few months. We plan on doing that before putting it on the marked as the house was built in the 60's and hasn't been kept up too well. Hopefully they won't frown upon the copper and cast iron connection.

Andy
 
 

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