Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Plumbing, Piping, Water Heating, Wells, Air & Water Filtration and Conditioning > Water Heaters
Reload this Page >

Low water pressure after hot water heater install, no opportunity for backflush

Low water pressure after hot water heater install, no opportunity for backflush


  #1  
Old 03-05-13, 09:53 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Low water pressure after hot water heater install, no opportunity for backflush

Hi--
I had a 38 gallon GE tank installed inside a boarded up cabinet. The stainless steel flexible connector leading out from the tank sprung a leak and damaged the particle board under my kitchen vinyl before I knew what was happening...anyway, I eventually figured out I had to shut the water off in the yard, at the meter, because there are no valves in the space with the heater. A neighbor who does flooring professionally and has installed heaters helped me out with both. The heater is in a tighter space than is sensible, so the thing was kind of MacGuyvered into the space. Given the fact it was already kind of old, I decided to replace it now rather than look forward to another flood if it died and leaked again, esp since getting another one in would be tricky for me on my own. We did that, with another GE 38 gallon, just the same... we did everything the same as had been done with the last one, which meant replacing all three pipes coming out of the top with shorter versions so that they go right into elbows at the surface of the unit (due to the low headspace). (Presumably this is not relevant info, bc everything was fine with this setup before, but just in case...)
We did let the tank fill before turning the heater on. We let out the air of the faucets before doing so, but not quite enough I guess. When I first realized the pressure was low I opened up the T&P valve to get a bit more air out of that, then did the same with the bathroom faucet and tub (the kitchen had been flowing but barely). I would say during the whole process from the leak to getting the tank in, the water got turned off and then on probably four or five times--the whole water flow to the house, cold included. The house is from 1955. I'm assuming there was some dislodge and now that is the issue. I cannot backflush because I can't cut off water to the heater without cutting off all the water to the house (short of diverting the cold input to somewhere other than the heater, or sealing it off somehow). I do not know the chain of flow from one sink/ tub to another, but they are all experiencing different symptoms. These are the symptoms, starting in the order I would guess the chain of flow exists (they all share a wall):
1) bathroom sink--hot water and cold run in equal strength (which is actually quite strong, but it was always insanely strong, so I think it may be less now), and running both results in the expected increase in pressure. so just a small reduction overall, possibly none.
2) bathroom tub--cold runs pretty strong, at least compared to before. If it's less than before it's hard to place. Hot runs significantly less, maybe half. Running it in between the two temps gives you a flow halfway between the strong cold and weak hot.
3) kitchen sink--always had a modest flow compared to bathroom, but was perfectly fine. Now is also maybe half that, for both hot and cold. Turning it from hot only, to cold only, to both, produces zero difference in flow.
Thoughts? Next steps? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Should I attempt to divert/ stop the cold water to the heater somehow and conduct a backflush, even though the kitchen has poor cold flow as well?
Thanks,
Andy
 
  #2  
Old 03-06-13, 06:19 AM
P
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 28,115
Received 2,256 Upvotes on 2,009 Posts
Boy, that is one big, hard to read blob of words. Do you have a cliff notes (shortened) version.
 
  #3  
Old 03-06-13, 05:16 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I installed a new hot water heater and now I have low pressure--sometimes hot, sometimes both--it's a mix. I'm assuming there was some dislodge. I cannot backflush because I can't cut off water to the heater without cutting off all the water to the house (short of diverting the cold input to somewhere other than the heater, or sealing it off somehow). These are the symptoms, starting in the order I would guess the chain of flow exists (they all share a wall):
1) bathroom sink--hot water and cold run in equal strength (which is actually quite strong, but it was always insanely strong, so I think it may be less now), and running both results in an increase in pressure. so just a small reduction overall, possibly none.
2) bathroom tub--cold runs pretty strong, at least compared to before. If it's less than before, it's hard to place. Hot runs significantly less, maybe half. Running it in between the two temps gives you a flow halfway between the strong cold and weak hot.
3) kitchen sink--always had a modest flow compared to bathroom, but was perfectly fine. Now is less than half that, for both hot and cold. Turning it from hot only, to cold only, to both, produces zero difference in flow.
Thanks,
Andy

 
  #4  
Old 03-10-13, 09:15 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Well, someone I know suggested taking out the cartridge behind the shower handle and cleaning it out. When I took it out there wasn't much to see but I went and turned the water main back on and it blew out huge pieces of rust and metal--over the amount a nickel would contain. Needless to say, my pressure is better than before, even.
On a side note, as to the other two faucets, they sort of balanced themselves out after I got rid of any further air by running the dishwasher and washing machine, which had not occured to me to do before.
Hope this helps anyone who stumbles across this with the same problem! Sorry for the original length--so many responses to other posts complain that not enough information was given that I was trying to accomodate that, and overdid it.
Thanks,
Andy
On
 
  #5  
Old 03-10-13, 09:21 PM
lawrosa's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Galivants Ferry SC USA
Posts: 15,993
Received 85 Upvotes on 77 Posts
Ahhh thats fine... Try cleaning the aerators out at the sinks. May have sediment there too.

Other then that your good right???
 
  #6  
Old 03-10-13, 09:41 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
More than good...my neighbor even helped me replace the damged section of particle board in my floor! Thanks...
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: