electric water heater element burning out


  #1  
Old 03-09-14, 03:53 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: usa
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
electric water heater element burning out

I live in a mobile home park and we have a well and pump house for everyone in the park. The pump for the well breaks down a lot and every time it does my electric heating element burns out and I have to replace it. The park says it is not happening due to the pump going out and refuses to pay for my repair. I think it is either because of the lack of water pressure and all the water in my water heater is draining back into the main line or it is burning out from all the gook that comes back into my water heater after they get the pump repaired.
Any help out there?
 
  #2  
Old 03-09-14, 04:52 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 16,321
Received 39 Upvotes on 31 Posts
If the water is siphoned from the heater when the supply pressure drops it can expose the elements. If the elements are energized when not completely immersed in water they will burn out. You could install a check valve on your incoming water piping (from the well pump) to prevent the siphoning action. If you do then you MUST have an expansion tank on the water heater inlet piping.
 
  #3  
Old 03-09-14, 05:07 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: usa
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Soo are u saying that the water can be drained from the water heater when the pump is shut down? I do have a water meter attached to my water line. Before they put the water meter in I never had this problem. I already knew that if the element was exposed to air it would burn out.
 
  #4  
Old 03-09-14, 05:21 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Jersey
Posts: 65,401
Received 4,046 Upvotes on 3,630 Posts
So are you saying that the water can be drained from the water heater when the pump is shut down?
Yes... exactly......and it has nothing to do with the water meter.
 
  #5  
Old 03-09-14, 05:35 PM
D
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: usa
Posts: 3
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I thought it could, I argued this point with the park management and they still try and say that it could not happen. I say yes it can. they just don't want to pay to replace my heating element.

Thank you for your help.
 
  #6  
Old 03-10-14, 12:33 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 16,321
Received 39 Upvotes on 31 Posts
IF your water meter has an in internal back flow prevention check valve then it could keep the water from siphoning from the tank.
 
  #7  
Old 03-10-14, 07:13 AM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 9,875
Received 186 Upvotes on 167 Posts
IF your water meter has an in internal back flow prevention check valve then it could keep the water from siphoning from the tank.
Notice that Furd said IF; not all water meters have a built in check valve. I didn't need an expansion tank till the last time my water meter was changed and the new meter had a check valve built into it.
 
  #8  
Old 03-13-14, 03:07 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 630
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Couple of comments .

Are you replacing the element yourself or paying some one to do it ?

4500 watt elements , at the big box stores , are 10 - 20 dollar ball park and not that hard to replace ( if they are the screw in type ) .

You can buy a " Sand Hog " element that is suppose to survive operation out of water . It is more expensive .

God bless
Wyr
 
  #9  
Old 03-18-14, 05:39 PM
A
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 4,556
Upvotes: 0
Received 285 Upvotes on 260 Posts
There is a device called a vacuum breaker of which styles are made to go on the cold water inlet of a water heater. The purpose is to open up and admit air if suction should occur from the main cold water supply (and close up again when water pressure is restored).

Without the vacuum breaker there have been occasional instances of hot water tanks in nearby houses collapsing due to high suction when a fire engine pumper was hooked up to a hydrant outside.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: