Hot water line taking forever to drain


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Old 05-17-14, 03:22 PM
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Hot water line taking forever to drain

I drained, then removed my water heater. It's been at least 5 hours now and I still have water pouring out of the hot water line. It will stop for a few minutes, then come sprinkling out again. I could have taken a shower with what came out about 5 minutes ago. I have to solder on this line and obviously can't with water pouring out of it. I've already opened every hot water line in the house. Is there any scenario where new water can be finding its was into this line? Thanks.
 
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Old 05-17-14, 03:43 PM
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Is there any scenario where new water can be finding its was into this line?
Sure.... if your water main or service valve doesn't shut off completely.
 
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Old 05-17-14, 03:51 PM
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Solder a valve on the hot water side. Do this with the valve open... You need to use mapp gas at a minimum.. I do it all the time.

Once soldered close the valve and continue to install the heater.
 
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Old 05-19-14, 05:53 AM
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Do you have any other cold water faucet that is below the level of the water heater feed? Like for a laundry tub?

Open that faucet.

Alternatively, is there an in-line valve below the level of the water heater feed that has a little cap on the side? Such a valve is sometimes referred to as "stop and waste"; I don't know where the term comes from. Open that valve except if it is the main cold valve in which case close it, then remove the cap. (Be sure to replace the cap before turning the water back on.)

Depending on the slope of the various pipes together with a phenomenon called surface tension, a main valve that isn't or won't close completely may result in water coming out an open end in bursts rather than as a slow uniform drip.

If you solder on a new shutoff valve to the open end of the water heater feed (using Mapp gas or whatever) you need to open that valve again before soldering pipe to the other side of that new valve. Or you can solder a length of pipe at least 6 inches long to the other side first (with the valve open) before attaching the valve to the open water heater feed. Soldering on a valve that is closed can damage the valve.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 05-19-14 at 06:17 AM.
 

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