Water heater in kitchen needs pan for insurance


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Old 07-16-14, 04:47 PM
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Water heater in kitchen needs pan for insurance

My water heater is located in the kitchen, a middle room in this house, my insurance co. is threating to cancel me unless I install a pan and drainage, there is no close exterior wall to put a gravity line, the genius in the plumbing section at HD said I need to run the drain line on the floor or drill the slab I would think there is a better way, something like a pan with a pump that I could plumb into the sink drain, kinda like the dishwasher?
 
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Old 07-17-14, 04:32 PM
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How easily could you raise the water heater by about 3 or 4 inches? You'll have to shut off the power (if electrically heated) and drain the heater completely anyway to get it into the pan.

With the water heater raised a little you could install a small ejector pump (with reservoir aka sump) on the floor next to the pan.
 
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Old 07-17-14, 04:49 PM
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I'm not sure if there is such a thing as a pump that would meet the possible volume requirements if the PRV let go or there was a catastrophic failure of the tank. I believe thats why all PRV piping and drain pan piping is required to gravity drain to the outside of the living space. This isn't like the drain pan on an A/C coil installed in the attic.

How exactly did the issue with the insurance company come about?
 
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Old 07-17-14, 04:53 PM
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I'd consider moving the water heater. Seeing your location is Florida I'm guessing you could do as we often do here if no where else to move it, add a 3'x3' lean-to on the back of the house. Of course there is also the garage or or attic option though I don't like the attic. Where is your washer dryer? Putting it there would make piping easy.
 
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Old 07-17-14, 07:02 PM
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What, no floor drain? How did that house ever pass inspection?
 
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Old 07-17-14, 07:30 PM
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The WH is in the kitchen. He's in Florida so probably slab, no basement.
 
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Old 07-18-14, 07:54 AM
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The WH is in the kitchen. He's in Florida so probably slab, no basement.
I think a floor drain would still have been required because the water heater was on a concrete floor especially since there was no adjacent outside wall.
 
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Old 07-18-14, 08:37 AM
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Mostly slab houses here (though maybe not a good indication of what's in Florida) but never seen a WH in the kitchen of a slab house, just in block and beam, so can't comment on the drain question. Considering the logistics and cost of adding a drain moving the WH makes sense to me but I'm not there. Guess we need to wait for Cyber-junckie.
 
 

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