Newly installed water heater is already corroding?


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Old 08-22-15, 08:14 PM
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Newly installed water heater is already corroding?

Hey guys, I installed a Rheem Performance Plus 40 gallon gas water heater a few months ago and just this evening noticed that on the COLD water line (the water coming into the water heater) there is lots of corrosion around the connection..

Is this from the dielectric union being faulty? Or is this from the actual water heater valve itself??

Should I just replace the union and see if it happens again?

The union on the hot water (outlet pipe) is SPOTLESS with no corrosion what so ever.

Thanks for any information!
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Old 08-22-15, 08:17 PM
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Is that a copper pipe connected to a galvanized steel union?
 
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Old 08-22-15, 09:08 PM
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It looks like it's leaking between the union and the cold water inlet pipe.
A water heater wouldn't normally corrode by itself.... especially in only a few months.

You may have to use a little Teflon tape and some pipe joint compound.
 
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Old 08-22-15, 09:12 PM
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Pulpo, it is a genuine dielectric union and Get, yes, it is probably a defective union.

I never use dielectric unions because invariably this is what happens, although it usually takes a bit longer than a few months. I recommend (and use) a BRASS or BRONZE nipple into the heater tapping, a brass or bronze threaded union and then a COPPER thread adapter. The longer the nipple the better. Never had a corrosion problem with this arrangement.
 
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Old 08-22-15, 09:19 PM
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Thanks for the quick replies guys, Furd do you have any pictures of the setup that your talkig about? It would be very helpful.
 
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Old 08-22-15, 09:31 PM
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Possibly something like this.....

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Old 08-22-15, 09:45 PM
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PJ has it! Turn the union around so that the ring nut is above the body, that makes it a bit easier to connect as you have gravity pulling the nut down so all you need to do is align it to the body.

Just remembered, most of the steel nipples in water heaters have heat traps internally and they are also tightened into the tank so hard as to be almost impossible to remove. In this case use the brass/bronze union directly on the steel nipple and add the brass/bronze nipple on the other end of the union with a female thread adapter to the copper piping. Ideally you want six inches of brass or bronze between the steel and the copper.
 
 

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