Gas Valve Leak on State Water heater with intellivent


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Old 12-28-15, 01:11 AM
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Gas Valve Leak on State Water heater with intellivent

Hi: Thanks for reading this. I have a State HWH (PR650XCVIT) that I just picked up used and "in good working condition." I installed it without connecting it to the vent to check that it was all working properly. It fires up fine, but when I leave it with no power and "off," then natural gas leaks from the HWH exhaust vent. I can't smell any gas anywhere else and I've checked all the lines for leaks - there aren't any. The only thing left to leak is the valve mechanism (183760-000). Do these valves leak a little bit of gas normally, or is there a problem with mine. Mine sat for a about a year before I used it again.

Is it possible that this issue will go away once the unit gets into regular use?
Could the gas line pressure be too high for the valve controller?
Other suggestions?

Thanks

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Last edited by ala.frosty; 12-28-15 at 01:29 AM. Reason: Is line pressure too high?
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Old 12-28-15, 03:31 AM
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I am not familiar with your water heater but I can state that NO gas valve "normally" leaks any amount of gas. It should be an absolute, 100% shut-off and if it is leaking then something is WRONG with the valve.

Notice that your heater is placarded as having a maximum inlet pressure of 1/2 psi. If your incoming gas pressure is higher then it might, possibly, be causing the regulator and valve to open slightly. A pressure of 1/2 psi is a little less than 14 inches of water column, standard incoming natural gas pressure in the US is generally around 7 inches of water column and is then regulated down to about 3.5 inches of water column by the regulator in the automatic gas valve of the appliance.

Sometimes natural gas is regulated to 2 psi at the meter and then further reduced to less than 1/2 psi with an additional regulator before the appliance regulator/gas valve assembly. This higher pressure is almost exclusively used when the home was originally plumbed for propane gas and the existing piping is too small for the standard natural gas pressure.
 
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Old 12-28-15, 04:05 PM
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That heater looks to be 12 years old from the S/N... Ummm Is that a intellivent WRodgers gas valve?

That will cost $$$$ to fix.. I would throw the heater away and buy a new one..

Its a power venter.. About $850 at supply house .com for a new one..
 
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Old 12-29-15, 05:49 AM
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Yes, it doesn't have the "intellivent" name on it, but the old part number correlates with new intellivent part number 9004240005. Yes, it's a spendy controller. I think I'll try disconnecting the gas line, turning it on, and seeing if I can blow compressed air through it in case a bit of dirt is causing the valve to hang open a tiny bit.
 
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Old 12-29-15, 03:24 PM
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Furd brings up an issue...Is the gas valve for natural gas or propane? If the previous use was propane, or vice versa and you are now using it for the other, you may experience a gas odor. The orifices are differently sized to accommodate different pressure, amongst other things.

Like others have said...12 year old unit is fast approaching time for replacement. You could spend a lot of time, effort and money trying to solve the gas issue and it could leak the same day.
 
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Old 12-30-15, 12:36 AM
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I'm trying to fix it. It's a DIY project.
 

Last edited by ala.frosty; 12-30-15 at 01:26 AM.
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Old 01-01-16, 06:52 PM
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Fixed it

I have to say that completely due to the lack of information and frustration I experienced with the lack of assistance in a DIY fix, I became motivated to take the unit apart and fix the valve leak. Both valves had some minor deposits on the valve faces. I cleaned them off with 600 paper, and cleaned the valve seats, too. Put it back together and it's working fine now.
 
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Old 01-01-16, 07:07 PM
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These valves are not made to be field repairable. How do you know that the valve will reliably close under fault conditions? By "fiddling" with it you have voided any NRTL (Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratory) certifications as to the valve operation. If this is anywhere other than your "owner occupied" single family dwelling you could be liable for criminal prosecution if anything happens (such as a fire) that can be traced to your work.

It is your life but what you did was WRONG!
 
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Old 01-02-16, 02:30 AM
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**********
The valve is out of warranty, so regardless of any certifications, no firm would voluntarily take ownership for an issue with the failing unit - as evidenced by their unwillingness to replace the unit under warranty.

The undocumented assertion about NRTL certification becoming void is baseless. Here is the OSHA documentation on how to void an NRTL certification:

https://www.osha.gov/dts/shib/shib021610.html

Specifically, I draw readers' attention to: a unit's function must be changed in order for a certification to become voided.

During the overhaul, the malfunctioning unit functionality was returned to factory original status (ergo, the original unit functionality was not changed). Additionally, it was continuity tested, leak tested and functionally field tested to ensure that original functionality returned.

*******************************************************************
 

Last edited by GregH; 01-02-16 at 04:30 AM. Reason: Rude and uwarrated comments removed.
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Old 01-02-16, 04:42 AM
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You have it all wrong.
Your link is correct in that the certification for the furnace would remain if the valve was functionally the same after either repair or replacement.
What you fail to take into account is the fact that the certification for the valve itself is likely void because there is no acceptable field repair procedure for rebuilding that valve and you have no certification from the mfr to do so if there was.
Although this is a DIY forum, there are some things that are not meant to be tampered with.

In addition, members come here for "professional" advice and regardless of your willingness to experiment no professional in their right mind would dismantle a valve to patch it up and try to make it work.

Thread closed.
 
 

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