T&P Valve Began Leaking


  #1  
Old 02-24-16, 09:53 AM
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Question T&P Valve Began Leaking

I searched through the threads and didn't want to interupt someone else's so I'm beginning a new one.
My water heater is about 1 year old. It is leaking, dripping out of the relief valve.
My neighbor changed the valve since I'm not to keen on how to do some things. The valve is the correct valve.
The heater has a Status Light Code feature and by it's blinking I see it's Normal.
The water temperature has "Hot-A-B-C-Very Hot."
It was set on B and I turned it down to A, not that that will make much difference.
The neighbor pulled up on the tab on the valve and let water out about 3 times thinking it may have got a bit of corrosion on the threads while he changed it.

When I use the hot water it starts leaking then eventually stops.
On the internet they say if the valve is good then it must be too high of temperature of the water or the pressure is too high.

It was suggested to buy a pressure valve and hook it up to the outside faucet to see what the pressure is. I haven't done that yet.

I'm stumped on this one. I've included a picture.
Thank you.
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  #2  
Old 02-24-16, 12:50 PM
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So why not just go buy a gauge and see if it's the pressure?
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Winters-I...M213/205962470
On a well or city water?
If on a well there should be a gauge at the pump.
If city water there most often is a pressure relief valve in the main incoming line.
No pressure tank on the water heater?
https://www.google.com/search?q=wate...LrPVo6pgM-M%3A
 
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Old 02-24-16, 01:25 PM
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I'm not sure what you're asking me. I don't know if buying a pressure gauge....oh you know what, just forget it. I didn't come here to be interrogated.
 
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Old 02-24-16, 01:44 PM
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You asked what could be causing the issue.
No one here can see or even guess what's going on there without all the info.
All the items I asked needed to be ansewered for anyone to help you.
 
  #5  
Old 02-24-16, 10:31 PM
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Joe is correct. If you can't (or won't) answer our questions concerning your installation then we can't help you.

There is a possibility that your incoming (city?) water pressure is too high and that may be caused by a failing Pressure Reducing Valve (PRV). Thge ONLY way to ascertaining if this is the problem is to measure the water pressure and that requires a gauge.

Your water heater installation ALSO requires a properly sized and pressurized expansion tank. Since one is not visible in your picture we have to assume you don't have one.

It's your choice, help us to help you or go sit in a corner and sulk because we DARED to ask a few questions to clarify the problem.
 
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Old 02-25-16, 06:13 AM
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Okay, I get it. I apologize for being so short with you Joe.
I just didn't understand your questions and it sounded like you thought I knew what I was doing.
Did you mean, do I have city water or well water? If I'm understanding your question I have city water.
I haven't bought a pressure valve yet as I've been down in the back since Monday but may be able to get out and buy one today. In the meantime I was trying to do my homework about this leak.
Concerning an expansion tank- I read about them yesterday.
Furd, you say they are required? I didn't know that! I've never lived in a house before that's ever had an expansion tank.
I'm a woman living alone and like doing things myself for obvious reasons and because I like to try and fix things myself. Or at least find out what the problem is and then hire it done.
 
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Old 02-25-16, 06:16 AM
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"If city water there most often is a pressure relief valve in the main incoming line."

I'll need to look. I'm assuming that's outside where I shut the water off? It's an old house and the shut-off valve is outside.
 
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Old 02-25-16, 07:05 AM
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Most often the relief valve is inside.
Should look something like this.
Shop Pressure Reducing Valves at Lowes.com!
#1, Check that pressure.
There's really no good reason for it being any higher then about 50 PSI.
 
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Old 02-25-16, 03:14 PM
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There is no relief valve installed. My neighbor suggested maybe we need to put one on (pressure relief valve.)
I was reading another site. A man said this,
"The first installation I installed a pressure reducer since the safety valve was pushing a cup of water every night.
On this last replacement I HAD to add an expansion tank and have had NO such problems since.
Not only that but the tank's 5 year warranty is now nearly 3 YEARS over the limit and no problems."
I had a plumber come out and look at it today. He said he didn't know how to stop the leak, charged me $40 and left.
Are their some states that it's mandatory to have an expansion tank? None of my neighbors have any and I've never seen one in my life.
Thank you for your help. And I will get a pressure gauge.
 
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Old 02-25-16, 03:47 PM
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There is no relief valve installed
That would be a pressure reducing valve, not a pressure relief valve. The valve you had replaced on the side of the heater is a temperature & pressure relief valve.

Whether you need a pressure reducing valve is determined by the incoming city water pressure, that is why it is important to check the pressure coming from the city.

Has the city changed your water meter recently? Newer water meters almost all have a backflow preventer or check valve built into them and that valve will cause your now closed plumbing system to build up high pressure that can cause the relief valve to leak during the heating cycle of the water. The purpose of the expansion tank is to allow the water to expand as it heats without building up the pressure in the system.

By the way, your T&P relief valve on the side of the water heater needs to be piped down to within 6 inches of the floor.
 
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Old 02-25-16, 04:02 PM
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Several years ago the US Environmental Protection Agency mandated that all municipal water agencies install some type of backflow prevention device on all metered services. I don't know what type of timetable was given but I do know that it hasn't been completed. Generally, the water companies are installing new meters that have a built-in check valve to prevent the water from running backwards into the main from a house.

When you heat a tank of water from the ambient temperature to about 130 degrees (plus/minus) it will expand about 4%. In the past this simply pushed water backward from the heater, through the meter and into the city main causing no perceptible pressure increase. With the new meters stopping the back flow the pressure in the house DOES rise and sometimes it rises to the point of causing the safety valve on the water heater to slightly open and release the excess pressure. The water utility is supposed to notify the homeowner that an expansion tank is now needed to absorb the excess pressure but many do not. I know that when my meter was replaced they never told me anything other than my water would be shut off for about ten minutes while they did the work.

Depending on how the plumbing in a house is done there may be air chambers or water hammer arrestors that, if working properly, can absorb the increase in pressure but the proper method is with an expansion tank. This could be why your neighbors don't have problems...yet.

There are other possibilities but my fingers are about to fall off so I can't type anymore at this time.
 
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Old 02-27-16, 07:29 PM
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The pressure at the front spigot and the back spigot are both 86.
I only checked it once. I'll do some more checks to get an average.
I called State as they are the company who manufactures the water heater.

After telling the rep what has been done she said to check the pressure of the water heater and it should be under 150. If it's not, it a faulty tank and the warranty would kick in.

She said there are only 2 things that can make the T&P valve leak- a faulty valve or its an environmental problem meaning the air around it is too hot/too cold.

A plumber looked at it and suggested an expansion tank not being 100% certain that would stop the leak. He also said 86 psi isn't high enough to make the valve leak. My neighbors pressure is at 100.

I asked her how to check the pressure on the tank and I think she said connect the gauge to the drain valve. Would that be right?
Thank you both again!
 
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Old 02-28-16, 04:25 AM
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What's the Factory Setting on your Pressure Relief Valve; it's printed on the metal tag ?

That will determine whether it "should" be leaking.
 
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Old 02-28-16, 02:39 PM
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The temp is 210. The pressure is 150psi.
I connected the pressure gauge to the drain valve on the heater and it went to to 130 but has now backed off to 110.
 
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Old 02-28-16, 03:00 PM
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This might get you by. Get a drip leg. I too recommend xtank.0066103 - Watts 0066103 - 100XL, 3/4" T & P Relief Valve (175 PSI, 210 F)
 
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Old 02-28-16, 03:06 PM
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Wait a minute , you said that the tanks rated at 150? Never mind then. They got 150 but you want to be below.
 
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Old 02-28-16, 05:19 PM
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I connected the pressure gauge to the drain valve on the heater and it went to to 130 but has now backed off to 110.
Run some water to get rid of the excessive pressure and check it again. If the city water pressure is still 110 you have a faulty pressure reducing valve. The maximum pressure shouldn't be over about 55 to 60 psi without the heater increasing the pressure through the heating cycle. You still need the thermal expansion tank and it should be charged with air pressure equivalent to the city water pressure.
 
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Old 02-29-16, 01:57 PM
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I don't have a pressure reducing valve on the heater.
I just got home from work. The gauge shows it was up to 160 degrees. eeekkkkk.
 
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Old 03-01-16, 04:40 PM
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I don't have a pressure reducing valve on the heater.
The pressure reducing valve goes on the main line entering the house, right after the main shutoff valve.

I just got home from work. The gauge shows it was up to 160 degrees. eeekkkkk.
Degrees? That is definitely too hot. I thought you were using a pressure gauge, do you have a system thermometer too?
 
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Old 03-02-16, 02:44 PM
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Degrees? I meant to say pressure. *sorry.
I have a plumber coming out to put a reducer on.
 
 

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