Water heater temperature ?


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Old 10-12-16, 06:42 PM
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Water heater temperature ?

Regardless of the safety of having too hot of water, in theory can there be reliability or possible heater problems if a water heater is set too high?

Thanks,
Jerry
10/12/16
 
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Old 10-12-16, 06:55 PM
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Electric or gas water heater ?

Although some manufacturers set water heater thermostats at 140F, most households usually only require them to be set at 120F, which also slows mineral buildup and corrosion in your water heater and pipes.
 
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Old 10-12-16, 07:00 PM
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State is PA. Heater is gas.
 
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Old 10-12-16, 07:10 PM
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I had actually edited my first post and added the reasons for lowering the temperature.
Is there a particular reason you want to run it hotter ?
 
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Old 10-13-16, 02:33 PM
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My son who lives in PA recently moved there. He has 3 floors. When visiting, I stayed in lower floor (finished basement). The hot water was scalding for my shower. My son tells me they keep it that way because the hot water to the 3rd floor takes some time to heat up.

I told him to install a recirculation pump (I use one in our house) and/or a lower floor shower faucet that dials back scalding water (I too have that).

So, if that is the right approach, I think he is going to follow through.

Jerry
 
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Old 10-13-16, 03:06 PM
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You don't even need a pump. A dedicated line from the third floor to a tee on the drain valve will cause the hot water to flow by itself as the hot water rises and the cold water settles.

Not 100% sure but I believe you'll need a back flow preventer to keep water from going back up your dedicated recirculater line.
 
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Old 10-13-16, 04:38 PM
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The hotter the water the shorter the life of the water heater tank you can expect. This is because chemical actions including rusting out of the tank is accelerated.

But, the hotter the water, the more showers can be taken with a given tankful. Obviously more cold water needs to be mixed in to get back to the desired temperature ergo the sum total volume of water you get is greater.

Note that if you are taking a long shower upstairs, the water will eventually get almost to the same 140 degree temperature up there as the pipes warm up from the water flowing through.

More then 120 degrees and you have a safety scalding hazard.

Commercial operations on average need higher water temperature and/or a greater volume of water at that temperature. For this reason water heater maker void the warranty if you use what they consider a residential grade water heater in a commercial setting.
 
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Old 10-13-16, 05:09 PM
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Pete/Alan

Pete, was hoping another line would not be necessary. Speaking for myself, I get a little nervous when considering running additional water lines, especially having to go behind walls and then wondering if another issue will appear due to an additional line. I can see tear-up and expense. Also, I suspect the 2nd floor has similar problems as the top floor.

So, if I choose to use a pump, is that still a feasible option?

Alan, I realize the water will eventually get hotter to the third floor. But from my experience, the length of time the water must run until it gets hot is rather long and frustrating to wait. Also, I consider it a waste of water to wait until it gets hot. With my pump, my hot water comes on in a very short time on both my top and second floors (3 story house). Well worth the addition of the pump and very minimal installing steps.

Jerry
 
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Old 10-13-16, 05:25 PM
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You can get recirculating systems that don't require a return line back to the water heater. They aren't as convenient as the other systems as you have to press a button to initiate the recirculation. When the button is pressed, the pump runs water from the hot line to the cold line until a temperature sensor senses that the water is hot.

Advantages: No return line needed. Doesn't waste as much water as it only runs when you've pressed the button, so you aren't circulating hot water all day or for long periods based on time of day.

Disadvantages: Have to push the button (you can have more than one, say in multiple baths). Because warm water is pushed into the cold line at first, some people don't like that cold water can be warm for a little while. Have to find a spot under a sink to install the (small) pump and it needs an outlet for power. Have to find a place for the button.
 
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Old 10-13-16, 05:46 PM
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Paul -

An interesting approach. Although it meets some criteria, don't think it is the way I would choose.

Thanks,
Jerry
 
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Old 10-13-16, 07:34 PM
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What to do with wasted water waiting for the water to get hot:

Catch it in a bucket. Pour the water into the toilet tank immediately after a flush (need to leave the lid off, can do that when you don't have company or kids sleeping over).
2: If you often have to flush twice to make everything go down, pour the bucket contents into the toilet bowl as a flush is taking place
3. Use that water for watering plants, mopping the floor, or pour it into the washing machine just before starting the cycle.
 
 

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