Bradford White Anode Rod Replacement on a 1994 Water Heater


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Old 11-28-16, 04:44 PM
T
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Bradford White Anode Rod Replacement on a 1994 Water Heater

Yes, I have a working 1994 Bradford White 80 gallon water heater in the home we just moved into.

I first installed a full port ball valve at the drain (bottom) because I do the sediment washout.

Should I do the anode rod replacement ...with the following facts:

* I have not seen the anode rod because it is impossible to remove it without destroying the nipple threads;

* I have well water and there was very little sediment when I did the maintenance;

* We have a water softener and have 8 grains/gal before the softener;

* The water heater has a dip tube with small ports on it which Bradford White claims keeps the sediment to a minimum;

* I have no idea of the history of the heater since I just moved in.

Any input is appreciated!

P.S. Is it true that if a water heater is VERY old that changing the anode rod will make it worse?
 
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Old 11-28-16, 06:43 PM
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IIWM, I'd just plan on replacing the tank soon and beginning the regimen of changing the anode periodically with the new heater.

A 22 year old water heater is most likely on borrowed time.

If the anode has never been changed, it might be next to impossible to break it loose. An impact wrench is the tool of choice.

There isn't a relationship between sediment and corrosion or lack of corrosion of the anode.

If the sediment hasn't been regularly flushed it often compacts into a more or less solid mass so you get squat when you do flush it.

Residual salt in the water from a softener will accelerate the erosion of the anode.

I don't believe changing the anode on an old heater will make things worse from a corrosion standpoint. But the stress to the tank of breaking the anode loose may very well hasten a leak from any rusted thin parts of the tank.
 
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Old 11-28-16, 07:42 PM
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Thanks for the reply!
FYI:

* It's an anode rod connected to the hot water nipple, not a hex for use with an impact wrench.
* I already drained the tank and it drained full flow with the original valve!
* I replaced the valve with a full-port ball valve.
* I sucked out all the sediment with a wet shop vac using a hose attachment fed through the opening after removing the lower heating element.

I might just leave it alone but I need an 80 gallon tank and I REALLY dont want to spend $1500 on an 80 gallon heat pump (only ones made for 80 gal) that are not DIY repair-able.
 
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Old 11-29-16, 07:15 AM
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You could put two 40 gallon tanks in series. Fairly common these days.
 
  #5  
Old 11-29-16, 12:18 PM
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Brilliant! Thank you very much.
 
 

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