Sizing new water heater

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-06-17, 05:30 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 603
Sizing new water heater

Looking at replacing 15+ yr old GE gas water heater that will not light any more. Have already pulled out the igniter assembly to make sure it is clean and still, it only sparks, no flame. Temp has been up-and-down for several years.

Is it wise to be looking at dropping from a 50-gallon to a 40-gallon to be more efficient [i.e. with minimal demands, is it worth the switch]?

What are some possible code requirement changes [i.e. pressure canister, drain pan, etc] to expect after 15+ years? Currently, the only modifications are earthquake strapping and it is off the crawl space floor on bricks.

Any brands, types to avoid?


Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-06-17, 08:21 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,471
Upvotes Received: 16
Any efficiency gain from going to a 40 gallon heater will be minimal and not worth the very real possibility of running out of hot water, at least in my opinion. If you have a deep soaking or jetted tub then do not downsize. The newer water heaters have improved insulation so you will likely have less standby losses with a new 50 gallon model over the old heater.

I don't know if Kent is a party to the Welcome to MBP | MBP multi-government site but the King County requirements are shown in a tip sheet, item 7 on this page (pdf) Guidelines and Tip Sheets | MBP
 
  #3  
Old 08-06-17, 09:45 PM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 51,425
Upvotes Received: 214
Excellent link Furd. Looks like it pertains to all of Washington state.
 
  #4  
Old 08-07-17, 10:55 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,471
Upvotes Received: 16
The My Building Permit site does not cover the entire state. Washington has 39 counties and every one of them has the ability to alter the state building codes to some degree as does any "incorporated" city in any county.

This DOES make for some interesting anomalies in cases where a building on one side of the county line is different than a similar building mere feet away but on the other side of a county line. In the case of my home, located within the Bothell (city) limits but on the Snohomish County side (most of Bothell is in King County) the city has explicitly made the King County codes the rule anywhere in the city. A shame since Snohomish County codes are usually a bit more progressive.

Tpring lives in, or near, the city of Kent which is located in south King County. As far as I know Kent does not have any additional requirements so the KC requirements should be sufficient. I don't know if he needs to get his permit from KC or the city.
 
  #5  
Old 08-07-17, 11:23 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: usa
Posts: 603
Thanks Furd,

Typically I've had to go to the city [Renton] -- Going to stick with the 50 gal.

P.S. The permit/inspection for my hot tub was a bit stressful.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes