Water heater overheating in combustion chamber?

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  #1  
Old 03-16-19, 04:45 PM
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Water heater overheating in combustion chamber?

Pilot wouldn't light, had to get new Valve/pilot assembly, and TRD (Thermal Release Device) from manufacturer (thankfully all under warranty). Got it all back together, and WH works.

So... now I'm thinking about why the TRD failed. Apparently this thing fails when the temp gets too high in the combustion chamber.

That would be consistent with the initial problem, when the pilot wasn't lighting... when I removed the burner assembly the protective coating on the thermopile and sparker wires had disintegrated in spots, leaving bare wires exposed. I guess it all makes sense, because this WH is only 1.5 years old, and the burner looked blackened like it was from an older WH.

So apparently the temp in the combustion chamber was too high, and I probably need to do something about that.

Here's a video I recorded after I turned the burner back on, for the first time in about a week.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvMW1PQYx3U


That's too much orange/yellow, right? It was also making a noise, that sounded like water gurgling/boiling/something. I'm thinking it might be a venting problem? Unless the gas valves can be adjusted or something?

Vent pipe is clear, and it is only about 10 feet or so out to the end on the roof.


Thoughts? Venting or gas adjustment?


Rheem XG50T06EC38U1
 
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  #2  
Old 03-16-19, 06:48 PM
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I heard a little kids laughter come out of the vent hood. You're not cooking kids in there.

Residential water heaters manufactured after 2003 are “F.V.I.R.”. (Flammable Vapor Ignition Resistant) compliant.
1) A one way intake system to control the intake of make up air into the combustion chamber
2) A flame arrestor plate to provide a one way path for air to travel through
3) A sealed burner compartment door and assembly to create a sealed junction with the combustion chamber


The water heater manufactures have gone to great lengths to keep flammable gases from reaching the water heater flame. The problem is the devices that allow air into the burner chamber get clogged with dust. Especially if the water heater is near to the dryer. They need to be vacuumed. Your burner is lacking oxygen.
 
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Old 03-16-19, 07:33 PM
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I heard a little kids laughter come out of the vent hood. You're not cooking kids in there.
Haha, no!

Your burner is lacking oxygen.
Hmm. Ok, thanks. I briefly vacuumed it before I installed the burner. Also took a little wire and poked down through some of the grated panel on the bottom, a little. Might could do a better job.

There's insulation all behind the vent holes on the sides. Might could slide it out and see if it improves the situation or not.

It's in a small closet... not much room to do anything. Roof vent pipe looks big enough, but I can measure. I could easily cut a hole in the wall to the outside, to allow more air in, but I dont think I could keep cold/hot air from blowing in all the time.

I'll keep an eye on it and see if I can come up with anything that helps.
 
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Old 03-16-19, 08:49 PM
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A.O. Smith had lots of problems with their water heaters. I had one too that had the overheat problem. Check out the following link. It shows how the cleaning was handled. May not be exactly the same as your Rheem but it will be similar.

A-O-smith-water-heater-wont-stay-lit.
 
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