Can you install an expansion tank without soldering?

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Old 04-17-19, 06:40 PM
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Can you install an expansion tank without soldering?

I have installed a couple of hot water tanks in the past, but they were electric and did not have expansion tanks. Mine is gas and there currently is not an expansion tank, but it sounds like I need one now. I have never soldered pipe, but is there any other way to install one?
 
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Old 04-17-19, 07:46 PM
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You can use shark bites. Kinda pricey vs soldering though. Most box stores carry them.

https://www.sharkbite.com/products/brass-push-couplings
 
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Old 04-17-19, 08:38 PM
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The other option I guess is I could wait. I know someone that can do it but he is not available right now and I need to change this tank right away because the TPR is leaking more steadily. It won't hurt to hook it up without it for a few weeks, will it? I mean, there wasn't one there before so it wouldn't be any different.
 
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Old 04-18-19, 12:11 AM
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Until I moved into my current house I never had a expansion tank. Near as I can remember the excess pressure just dumped out the TPR valve. Not a plumber but I'm guessing they were required because of that or damage to the plumbing/tank if the TPR valve froze....just conjecture. A hot H20 tank can do some damage if it gives way due to pressure!

If your TPR valve is leaking (not because of expansion) why don't you just replace it vs the whole tank?
 
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Old 04-18-19, 02:39 AM
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I'm not a plumber so unknown if code requires an expansion tank, but being an open system and expansion would simply be absorbed by the incoming cold water line. Boiler systems are closed loop thus expansion needs a a place to go.

I'll watch for a pro answer.

Bud
 
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Old 04-18-19, 07:22 AM
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I guess I could replace the TPR valve but the tank is over 15 years old so it should be replaced anyways. This is a closed system because there is a pressure reducer and also a backfkow device.
 
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Old 04-18-19, 08:00 AM
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I thought about the backflow later but when I put mine in there was no caution about needing an expansion tank. I assume that the TPR valve is the fail safe. Plumbers should still be along but IMO, just a new TPR could be good for many years.

Bud
 
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Old 04-18-19, 08:41 AM
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I have never soldered pipe
I'm always surprised how reluctant people are to solder, watch a few videos, practice a dozen joints and you'll be there!

Got to start somewhere!
 
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Old 04-18-19, 09:28 AM
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My buddy is almost as good as this with a extrol and some shark bites.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0FW3J4iFM4w
 
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Old 04-18-19, 06:20 PM
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This is a closed system because there is a pressure reducer and also a backfkow device.

A pressure reducing valve doesn't necessarily mean you have a closed system, but a backflow preventer does. I never had an expansion tank nor did I ever need one till a few years ago when my water meter was changed and the new meter had a check valve in it. All these years I had a pressure reducing valve, but most of them have a bypass for thermal expansion. I immediately noticed after the new water meter how the pressure would build when the gas water heater fired and the relief valve would start discharging water. I temporarily, for a few years, placed a small bucket under the discharge pipe till recently. I finally got around to installing a new Bradford-White water heater and thermal expansion tank. All is good now.
 
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Old 04-18-19, 06:25 PM
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I was just typing my reply exactly like Joe's...... right down to the same quote.
You do need a pressure tank there.
 
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Old 04-19-19, 03:05 AM
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The need for an expansion tank is there regardless of whether the tank is electric or gas, etc.

Some experts have recommended that the temperature & pressure relief valve on a water heater be replaced every so many, say, ten, years.

If someone uses some water, hot or cold, while the water heater is kicked on, then the chances of the expanding water tripping the T&PR valve are less.

It is recommended that the T&PR valve be tested manually periodically but we are talking about every few months, not every day. It is not the purpose of the T&PR valve to relieve pressure every time a new tankful of water is heated. Every time the T&PR valve trips or is tripped there is the chance it may be held ajar by a bit of sediment and require (manual) jiggling to bet it closed again.
 
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Old 04-19-19, 04:42 AM
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Thanks all, on my list.

Bud
 
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Old 04-19-19, 09:34 AM
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Thanks for all the input. I can make this pretty easy now that I think about it. I will probably either make a shelf or just buy a bracket to mount it on the wall and put a brass tee on the water tank inlet. I will either run a flex line over to it or copper using shark bites, but the flex line will probably be cheaper and easier. This actually seems like a more secure setup that just having the tank supported by the pipe like I see in just about every video I found when I searched for the installation of these tanks!
 
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Old 04-20-19, 05:04 AM
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Under some obscure conditions an expansion tank can become filled with water and therefore become heavy. It should be physically secured so it cannot roll off of a shelf or weigh down on a pipe it is attached to.
 
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Old 06-28-19, 10:06 PM
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Have you checked the pressure coming out of the water heater? If not, get a pressure gauge from Ace hardware and check it. Granted, if the unit is 15 years old, it could be just near the end of its life. But of the pressure is high, ot could be the pressure reducing valve. You can check by attaching the gauge to the drain **** and opening it while water is not being used by the system. If the pressure is past manufacturer specification (what I usually deal with is 52 psi and under), you will need to reduce the pressure at the PRV. That being said, check pressure at the washing machine inlets. This will tell you whether you have a TPR (water heater only) problem, or a PRV (whole system) problem. Hope this helps!
 
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