Stainless tank with atmospheric vent natural gas brands?

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Old 01-14-21, 10:53 AM
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Stainless tank with atmospheric vent natural gas brands?

My A. O. signature is starting to rust after two years. Second time it happens..

Anyone aware of a stainless steel tank (40/50 gal range) natural gas with atmospheric vent? I could not find any. I did see HTP has stainless but they are high efficiency and I want to avoid creating a brand new vent for that,

Thank you.
 
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Old 01-14-21, 12:12 PM
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My A. O. signature is starting to rust after two years.
Starting to rust where..... on the outside ?
Please explain.

If you bought a water heater that had a stainless steel tank..... the outside would still be painted steel.
 
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Old 01-14-21, 12:31 PM
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When you say "starting to rust" after two years I have to assume you are talking about the outside shell. That has very little to do with what is happening inside the glass lined tank that holds the water. Even on premium water heaters the outer shell is really only there to protect the insulation and make the heater a bit prettier. They are all just painted thin sheet steel except for the few I've seen with a plastic outer shell.
 
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Old 01-14-21, 01:58 PM
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Thank you for responding. Sorry; I meant rust from the inside. Three weeks ago when opening the heater drain valve to do a maintenance drain I got concentrated orange rust water. I tested and there is magnetism so assumed it can only mean the tank (I have city water with a Pentek BB ChlorPlus 10 x 4.5 whole hose and a softener). A few days ago there must have been a rust blister rupture as I got full on rusty hot water all over the house and had to drain the whole tank, since then every day there is still orange water at the bottom of tank. No visible signs of failure outside yrt. The last one that failed on me started with expansion of the metal outside cover and then leaking, really want to avoid that again.
 
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Old 01-14-21, 06:21 PM
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The rust is not likely from the inside of the tank as they are usually lined with fibreglas. Do you know what the ph is from the city water system?
 
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Old 01-14-21, 06:38 PM
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PH at the tap is 7.5.
The spec page says ceramic protection, is fiberglass better? Can you recommend a brand that uses fiberglass?
https://www.lowes.com/pd/A-O-Smith-S...ter/1000213593

 
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Old 01-15-21, 05:49 AM
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How is your water filter? Is there evidence of the "rust" coming in from the water main and finer material getting through the filter?

Most water heaters have a "glass" lining which may be ceramic or porcelain. Usually as a slurry that is sloshed around inside and then baked using a large kiln. Fiber glass is for jacket insulation. There are a few tanks of electric water heaters that are all fiber glass, no metal.
 
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Old 01-15-21, 11:55 AM
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Filter is less than two months old and there are no indication of rust on the clear filter jar, initially I thought it might be resin brekdown from the softener, so I took out the valve and saw no resin coming out of the resin tank. Basement bathroom cold water is upstream from water heater, there was no rust there.
Did you ever come across stainless steel tanks that are atmospheric vented?
 
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Old 01-15-21, 03:06 PM
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Draining the water heater tank with the heating still live can cause this problem. For gas heaters the ceramic lining cracks and rust blisters can form as time goes on and the remaining tank life is severely shortened.

To be sure that the tank is refillled, don't turn the heating back on until you see water gushing from a hot faucet upstairs with no air spurts for a whole minute.

I have never seen a stainless steel water heater. So I would assume they are rare enough that finding every permutation of tank size and vent method and warranty length and recovery rate etc.would be difficult. Long time ago (before they invented power vents) I have seen copper water heaters but not recently. Those typically last more than 20 years.
 
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Old 01-16-21, 09:56 AM
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Did you ever come across stainless steel tanks that are atmospheric vented?
No, but here is a direct vent model. I didn't realize how hard it would be to find a water heater with a stainless steel tank. I wouldn't spend the money for a stainless tank. I don't think the rust is coming from your tank anyway.
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Westingh...P076/205625735
 
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Old 01-17-21, 12:25 PM
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Thank you! I'd spring for a higher price if they kept it simple, but with all these extra complexities I have a feeling something else will break.
guess I'll just wait for failure and do a warranty exchange. I'll try and diagnose more and report if I find anything.

Thanks for all the help!
 
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Old 01-18-21, 06:22 AM
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If you are having such trouble with your water heater have you had your water chemistry checked? I would begin by treating the water so it's more friendly to equipment prior to heating. If you are killing heaters so quickly you must also be having trouble with pipes, valves and faucets. Something must be going on that is causing your heaters to die so quickly. Your pH doesn't appear to be the problem.
 
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Old 01-18-21, 07:19 AM
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A standard (steel tank) water heater is at a disadvantage in copper plumbing system when it comes to dissimilar metal corrosion. The steel tank will sacrifice itself to protect copper pipes.

This is not necessarily bad, because it is usually easier to replace a water heater as opposed to replacing runs of pipe.

The magnesium or aluminum anode in the water heater is even more sacrificial. so as to greatly retard tank corrosion despite copper plumbing.
 
 

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