Tankless Water Heater - Condensation/Leaking at Flue Vent?


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Old 02-02-23, 02:31 PM
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Tankless Water Heater - Condensation/Leaking at Flue Vent?

Had a service tech over to track down a leak on our tankless WH (Rheem). They replaced the internal recirc pump. It appeared to be fine for a couple of days, checked again a few minutes ago and I am noticing water still on the floor. Checked the recirc pump and it's dry, no leak there. Kept tracking the leak down and I followed it to the top of the unit, it appears it's been leaking/condensing at the flue vent. Is this something that can happen with these? I have not noticed it, but it appears to have been happening for awhile now looking at the build up in the area. Does a drain hose need to be attached to the white nipple/barb on the side of the flue vent?



 

Last edited by msu50000; 02-02-23 at 02:33 PM. Reason: clarification
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Old 02-03-23, 06:52 AM
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Took another look this morning after drying the top of the unit off. There were some drops up there, the band clamp had a few drops around it. I was able to get maybe 2 full turns tighter with the screw but did not want to go further for fear of cracking or deforming the vent itself.
 
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Old 02-03-23, 08:37 AM
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Is that a drain port on the side that should be connected to a drip loop? I have not been able to find any details but did find an image that shows a drip loop. Many others do not.



Does a drain hose need to be attached to the white nipple/barb on the side of the flue vent?
​​​​​​​Probably would not hurt to try. The Tech should have known that.
 
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Old 02-03-23, 09:42 AM
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Thanks, I'll look into it. It's attached to that gray collar which is attached directly to the top of the unit, so even with a line there, I don't know how it will fill a loop and then have enough pressure to drain...
 
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Old 02-03-23, 12:56 PM
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As long as the top of the loop is below the attachment it will drain unless the loop gets clogged up with gunk. You may not need a loop, a straight drain could also work. I'm guessing the loop would prevent exhaust gas from going though the drain into the room. That wouldn't be good.

If you post a model number there may be installation instructions that can be found online.
 
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Old 02-03-23, 02:03 PM
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That gasket may be bad. The flue is purposely installed pitched back towards the heater so the water drains out thru the heater. That fitting on the top doesn't look a drain. More likely that's for checking the flue pressure.

As mentioned.... can't comment much more without a model number.
If you paid for service... you should call them back.
 
 

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