water filter question

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Old 03-24-04, 03:34 PM
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water filter question

Hello all, Im renovating the basement of my new home and I need to relocate a heavy duty whole house water filter,my question is; do I need a WHOLE HOUSE filter? Whats is the benefit of it? If I were to downsize and install one under the kitchen sink wouldnt that be good enough?I do have a hard water problem but I was told filters cant cure that ,is this True? Is filtered water better for washing clothes and taking showers? that doesnt make sense to me, any suggestions? Thanks.
 
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Old 03-24-04, 04:15 PM
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A whole house filter is designed to either reduce water borne particles (sediment) from reaching your aerators, flow restrictors, or they can be used to control odor or improve taste. Carbon filters are used for this reason, string wound or paper-type filters are used for dirt, sediment, rust.


Hard water cannot be controlled by a whole house filter alone.

Invest in a water softener for that problem.



Filters are great for a home, but you have to maintain them either on a time or gallon usage schedule. If you forget, they are worse than not having one at all, since they are a trap for catching everything that passes through it, let alone a breeding ground for bacteria if left unattended.




Remember, when buying filters, the better the filter works, the less gallons it can treat, the shorter life of the filter you use.
 
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Old 03-24-04, 05:10 PM
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Re: water filter question

When you say heavy duty and "downsize", I see a backwashed filter; not a disposable cartridge filter, correct?

Assuming it is.... usually they are used to 'treat' water. Meaning that it is removing something that is not capable of being mechanically filtered. In other words, somrthing is dissolved in the water that this filter is oxidizing which converts the soluble ions into particles and then the bed can mechanically filter them out. Lie ferrous iron, 'sulfur' manganese etc.. Then on a a set schedule the filter backwashes the particles out to drain. So you can't duplicate that activity into a disposable cartridge without allowing the 'contaminate' to go to the rest of the fixtures the new filter doesn't supply water to.

Gary Slusser
 
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Old 03-24-04, 06:35 PM
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Question More info please.

fbar:

It would be helpful to know more about your plumbing situation.

Are you on a well or municipal system?
Do you have a softener?
Describe in detail what type of filter you have.
 
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Old 03-25-04, 04:19 PM
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Hello again and sorry for the lack of information, I live in a municipal system,I do not have any type of water softener as of yet,and the filter I have is a disposible paper type cartridge filter. What I meant by downsize was to eliminate the filter which is an aqua pure AP801 and add a smaller version ( if there is one) under my sink.Hope this helps, Thanks again.
 
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Old 03-25-04, 04:56 PM
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fbar:

A sediment filter, which is what you have is not for removing hardness.
The AP801 uses a sediment/taste odor cartrige I believe.

The most effective way to remove hardness is to use a standard water softener.
You might do well to see if a sediment only cartrige is available to fit your housing and then install an under counter unit for drinking water.

 
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Old 03-25-04, 05:33 PM
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Well I missed on the backwashed filter sorry. But... you have a 4.5" x 10" cartridge right? That's what I think I see at CUNO's site (up to 60 gpm). You need to know what the filter is removing. If I'm right about the size, you can use sediment or 'regular' (not carbon block) GAC carbon cartridges.

I do not suggest removing chlorine on a "whole house" basis due to causing bacteria contamination and future odor problems. If the filter is removing dirt/rust and you remove it then you'll have that in the rest of your plumbing, clothes and dish washers, aerators and showerheads etc.. So you need to remove the cartridge and use the water for a few days and see what it looks like unfiltered. Then decide to remove the housing and if you need one under the kitchen sink; which I would advise against unless you wanted to remove chlorine. And then I'd tell you to use a cabon block to remove chlorine by-products (THMs if any, known carcinogens) from just your drinking and cooking beverage production water and you'd would install a separate faucet like used for an RO on the sink. Actually that type faucet mounts through the sink or counter like a hand held sprayer or soap dispenser.

You can get single to 4 stage drinking water filters with their own faucet from most independent water treatment dealers. Those fitlers will usually perform very well; much like an RO but with out the expense and hassel of an RO. There are any number of different media cartridges available, so you can customize the filtration for your specific needs but city water usually only needs THM and chlorine removal.

Gary Slusser
 
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Old 03-25-04, 06:29 PM
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fbar:

I forgot to mention that if you are on a municipal system you should be able to get the hardness, iron and other specifics from the waterworks department.
 
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Old 03-26-04, 07:32 AM
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In many cases the CCR data is an average of the water company's system and not specific to an individual house. So a water test of the specific location is best.

Gary Slusser
 
 

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