Culligan neutralizer refill


  #1  
Old 02-04-05, 09:45 AM
wmgroller
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Question Culligan neutralizer refill

Well, in the true nature of the "do-it-yourself" theme of this forum, I have a "how do I do it myself" question

I have a culligan neutralizer system installed (I believe it's a medallist - unfortunately I'm not at home to go check). I've had it for 2 years and last year my wife took the initiative to act on the yearly reminder that it was time to service the unit. Since she had already made the appointment, I let it go not realizing just how much they would rob me ($$) for the honor of their presence at my house. As I recall, the total service bill was approximately $120, with nearly $100 of that being "labor". Well, sorry, but as a pretty handy do-it-yourself kind of guy, $100 seems way too steep for filling up a neutralizer tank (their labor rate was $87 for the first 1/2 hour and around $20 for each additional quarter hour). So it's that time again and I cannot bring myself to continually pay $100 for their service.

So, that brings me to my question: is it relatively straight-forward to actually refill the neutralizer tank? Will Culligan sell me with the neutralizer mix I need, or will I have to find another source to buy from? Is there somewhere that I can find detailed instructions (or can someone here provide them) for doing this? Any details you can provide would be greatly appreciated. I was going to call Culligan, but honestly I don't trust answers given by a company that makes so much of their money off of service calls. I feel like they would mislead me into believing that they need to do it.

Thanks very much!
 
  #2  
Old 02-05-05, 10:18 AM
G
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Although I'm all for DIYers, the ease that it can be done with is dependent on the type of tank you have. A standard AN filter tank has a 1.25" top dome hole that you use to add mineral; you have a proprietary piece of equipment that I'm not familiar with. You also need to know what type and how much mineral is used. I know you believe they are charging too much but... I disagree and could get into the expenses they have just to show up at your house in a fully equipted vehicle let alone drive it back to the shop but I won't.

I don't know of any public instructions and basically, they possibly wouldn't fit your equipment.

With that said... you can take the control valve off the tank to add mineral but, you run a serious risk of lifting the distributor tube and that is a serious problem.

Gary
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Last edited by Doug Aleshire; 03-11-05 at 03:50 PM.
  #3  
Old 02-06-05, 09:52 AM
wmgroller
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Smile

Thanks Gary.

Just to clarify, it's not that I think Culligan is trying to rip me off with their rates. I totally understand that there is overhead involved with their service calls. It's more in my perception of what's actually being done during these service calls and what that costs me out-of-pocket. To me, the job of opening a filler cap, pouring in some neutralizer and running through a recharge cycle or two and waiting for it to complete is something that most people should be able to do themselves. That means paying only the cost of mineral (which last year cost me roughly 20 dollars). Paying someone else $100 to do this job seems like too much. By contrast, if they had to come out to re-run plumbing or install new components, then I could see paying $100 for 45 minutes of labor. Plus, the fact that Culligan doesn't make the information available for DIYers and sends reminder cards that sound more like danger alerts or threats doesn't help my perception, either.

Anyway, that's all irrelevant to my questions and I certainly appreciate your taking the time to give me your input. Thanks again.
 
  #4  
Old 02-06-05, 10:15 AM
Moli
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You might be able to find out how much and what type of mineral in the back of the manual for your unit. If you don't have one, their site might have it.

Culligan's policies are designed like an appliance guy who sells a refridgerator then charges you $50 a week to come out and put water in your ice cube trays. You know, you can't use tapwater to fill those trays, you have to use Culliwater.

Each trip might not be a ripoff per se, but the whole business model is a bit of a racket.
 
  #5  
Old 02-06-05, 07:57 PM
G
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An AN filter is specific to the installation location water quality and volume of water used and that dictates the type and volume of mineral and if a mixed bed, the percentage ratio of each mineral. Normally no dealer would disclose that info in the manual due to the situation possibly changing over time and/or to protect their 'territory'.

Gary
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Last edited by Doug Aleshire; 03-11-05 at 03:50 PM.
  #6  
Old 09-30-05, 07:27 PM
fcbaldwin
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I have a Culligan "Cullneu" tank hooked into my Mark100 system with softener, etc., and would also like to know how to renew the calcite. I bought a 50#bag of "food grade" fine calcite for water systems today for $16 at a plumbing supply and would like to know how to put it into the Culligan tank. Do I turn off the valve from the pump pressure tank before twisting open the brass cap on the tank? And then, do I scoop out any of the old media?
THANKS!
Frank
 
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Old 03-06-06, 08:09 PM
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I have a Cullneu, and according to the manual: "rotate the cam gear clockwise until water is observed flowing to the drain. Unplug the control.
Place the filter in bypass by pushing the red knob of the Cul-Flo-Valv Bypass fully inward or by closing the inlet and outlet valves adn oepning the bypass valve (three-valve bypass).
Remove the Quick-Twist Cap from the port opening. (NOTE: Some water supplies contain potentially hazardous gases. DO NOT inspect the interior of the tank using a spark or heat source, or an explosion may result)
Using a yardstick, measure the distance between the top of the media and the back top edge of the port opening (this distance is the freeboard). For nine-inch units, if the freeboard is greater than 22 inches, add enough Cullneu media to decrease the freeboard to 16 inches. For twelve-inch units, if the freeboard is greater than 26 inches, add enought Cullneu media to decrease the freeboard to 20 inches.
Wipe the port opening free of media and replace the Quick-Twist Cap. MAKE CERTAIN THE CAP IS SECURELY LOCKED INTO PLACE.
Place the bypass valve(s) in the service position, plug in the control, and re-set the time of day (Page 22). Allow the filter to continue to backwash and rinse cycles. The control will then return to the service position."


Hope you can make sense of that. I also found some places on-line for Calcite and Corosex, which I guess are the filter media, and some explanation of their use: www.advancedh2o.com, and www.plumbingsupply.com.
 
  #8  
Old 04-12-07, 03:53 AM
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Cullneu Refill

My Culligan guy was out yesterday to service my Cullneu unit. It was here when we moved in and hasn't been serviced in a long time, other than my occasional backflushing. It was completely out of cullneu material.

After turning off the water and releasing the pressure from the unit, he removed the inspection cap. It was difficult to get off, partly from not having been opened in a long time, and partly, he said, because sometimes there's a vacuum that forms inside when the pressure is released. The cap eventually was removed. He then used a hose to siphon off about 5 gallons of water from the unit. I assume this was done so the unit wouldn't overflow with water when the new material was added. Using a large funnel, he just poured in a new bucket of Cullneu material. After measuring to make sure the unit has the proper head space above the top of the material (I didn't ask what the depth should be ... gotta find out) he replaced the cap. I noted the cap has a rubber O-ring, and I assume that could need to be replaced once in a while. He then went through a backflush and rinse cycle. A lot of milky-looking fines were flushed from the new material during this process. He told me I should check it once every few months and just add new material when needed. He also said I can buy the material from Culligan (they'll deliver it to my house for an extra dollar) or find it elsewhere, but said buying from Culligan would ensure I got the correct material. That was all there was to it!
 
 

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