Any one heard of Technetic Plus Softener


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Old 02-12-05, 03:38 PM
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Question Any one heard of Technetic Plus Softener - Newbie Questions

I had an sales person in my house last night selling a "Technetic Plus" water softener by R&M Motor Company based out of Lindon Utah. http://www.rmmanufacturing.com/.

The sales guy was "willing" come take off $1000 bucks to come up with a "generous" offer of $2,995 for a softener and RO unit installed.

Does anyone have any experience with this type of softener? Based on their website, does anyone have an opinion on if it's worth that kind of money?

I'm very new to this. He made a pretty convincing presentation about our chlorine level and tested our hardness level to be about a 16.

Also, I was surprised that there is not any stickies in this forum with some sort of a FAQ or extremely useful threads that us beginners could read. Does anyone have any suggestions of threads that I can read to start getting my foot in the door?

Thanks!
 

Last edited by Boomschtick; 02-12-05 at 03:43 PM. Reason: more info
  #2  
Old 02-12-05, 07:18 PM
Moli
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My first tip would be don't let the guy trying to sell you water treatment equipment test your water, since their labs are so sensitive they have an uncanny ability to find hardness, arsenic, mercury, raw sewage, distemper and ebola in your water where sometimes they might not exist. Not that I'm suggesting they have a scam going or anything...

Does all this include labor? Assuming this is for a typical residence, I'd guess you can purchase a high quality softener and an R.O. filter closer to the $1000 range than the $3000 range. For $2000 saved, I bet you could learn to install it youself.

Also, R.O. filters have 2 or more cartridges that need to be changed periodically. Typically every 6 months. Ask him how much all the filters are going to cost you every 6 mos. If you have lots of chlorine, you may have to change them more frequently. You could probably find identical filters a lot cheaper, but it would be interesting to see how he'd charge you. They don't have any info on their residential R.O. systems, but the more "stages" your R.O. system has, the more filters you'll have to change.

And selling someone an R.O. system based on the need to reduce high chlorine levels seems a little shady. In an R.O. system, it's the carbon prefilters that get rid of the chlorine BEFORE they come into contact with the Reverse Osmosis membrane (which can be relatively expensive, but should last for a few years) -- most membranes are destroyed by chlorinated water. In other words, you could just use one or more industry standard filter housings, and some inexpensive (but high quality) carbon filters, and have the same level of chlorine reduction as with a much more expensive R.O. system.

"R&M Manufacturing was founded in 1981, and is now building and distributing the most complete line of water treatment systems, using the latest and most advanced technology offered in the industry."
 
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Old 02-12-05, 08:52 PM
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well.... the RO was for everything that the softener didn't take out.

The softener is supposed to have some kind of a filtering material that takes out all of the chemicals and the hardness, and the RO is for everything else after that to make the water "98% pure" (including the minerals and flouride).

The thing that I liked most about what he was offering was the system that controlls when the unit regenerates. Supposedly it only regenerates when it's needed, hence saving a lot on salt and water.

I also thought it seemed like a good idea that the water coming in for softening comes up from the bottom and out the top softened.

But what do I know!
 
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Old 02-13-05, 06:28 AM
Moli
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Even with "Big Box" store brands (Kenmore, GE, Whirlpool, etc), all but the least expensive units have "demand initiated regeneration" (regenerates only when needed). Those units start around $400, and while I think they are pretty good units if properly maintained, you can find even better units on the internet for maybe a couple hundred dollars more for a softener with similar capacity.

As for R.O. filters (I assume you're talking about undercounter ones for drinking water), you can find good ones (and bad ones) at the big box stores for $150-$200, and better ones for a somewhat higher price on the internet. But as I was saying earlier about filters, watch out. My unit has two filters that need to be replaced every 6 months, if I buy the "Whirlpool" brand they cost about $24 for both. If I buy the "Kenmore" brand, they cost about $50 for both. These are *identical* filters that come off the same manufacturer's assembly line side-by-side, so... He may sell you a "system" that needs $150 in new filters every six months. So make *absolutely* sure you know what you're getting into.

The system he's trying to sell you might be a perfectly fine system, but it still sounds wildly overpriced to me. Just my opinion, tho.
 
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Old 02-13-05, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Moli
Even with "Big Box" store brands (Kenmore, GE, Whirlpool, etc), all but the least expensive units have "demand initiated regeneration" (regenerates only when needed). Those units start around $400, and while I think they are pretty good units if properly maintained, you can find even better units on the internet for maybe a couple hundred dollars more for a softener with similar capacity.
Ok... can someone give me some suggestions on where to look for a good unit that's not going to run me $3k? Actually, I'd like to pay as little as possible (wouldn't we all) .From what I'm reading on this board, the valve is the most important factor and that I'll probably want to make sure that it's a 1" valve. Is that correct?
 
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Old 02-14-05, 08:05 AM
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They want way too much for their equipment. If they didn't show you something in your water that is only removed by RO, then you probably don't need one. That would be high levels of from arsenic to zinc. GAC and carbon block filters are a better choice for the removal of chlorine taste, odor and disenfection by products if any than RO.

You can read many posts here and get a good idea of what type of eqipment you should be looking at before buying anything.

There are many local and internet water treatment dealers that sell various equipent with the highest quality control valves. I would not suggest the big box store brands, at best or on average they currently last 3-6 years before repair is needed. They have warranties from 1-3 years while local and internet dealers have control valve with 5 year warranties and that includes the electronics. They sell equipment used in commercial applications; you'll never see a Sears etc. in a commercial establishment unless the owner is absoultely uninformed about water treatment.

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Last edited by Doug Aleshire; 03-11-05 at 03:36 PM.
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Old 05-15-07, 10:11 PM
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bucksdelucks

Internet bought systems can be used or incomplete ie... missing gravel or bypass ass.
You will be better off contacting a local reputable dealer and having a system installed for you! There are several good systems out there. When you purchase a quality system it can run as high as three or four thousand dollars however these systems do more than just soften the water. The technetic is a good product but should be in the 1700 to 2200 dollar range. Hague is another high quality product. The hague WaterMax is a truly unique system that has no comparison!

Good luck
 
  #8  
Old 01-06-08, 07:49 PM
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Technetic Water Softner Plus

Yes , I have one in my house that I am selling. I will sell the entire package for 1000.00.
 
  #9  
Old 01-07-08, 12:13 PM
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So, are you on city water or well water? If on city water your district will give you their latest testing results. If you have well water, I would spend a few pesos for a comprehensive inorganic water test. About 25+ possible contaminants, plus total hardness, calcium, pH, arsenic, manganese and more.........

I went thru this process with 8 companies to see about my iron and low pH problems. I did not get a water softener, just two tanks: calcite for the low pH and Birm for the iron. Works just fine. Paid $2200, installed and with a 5 year warranty for the valve and 10 yrs on the tank.

Point is, 6 of the companies wanted to sell me a water softener, ranging from $3500 to $5500. This much for something I could have bought over the net for $900 or less and paid a plumber $300 to install.

A BigBlue 4x10 inch carbon filter can probably fix your chlorine problem. A hardness (total hardness or calcium?) of 16 is not bad at all.

Don't rush into this.
 
  #10  
Old 03-29-08, 08:11 PM
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Lightbulb Technetic Plus 1100

Greetings all,

I was just browsing the web to find the user's manual for my Technetic Pluss 1100 water softener, and saw this thread. Just FYI, the unit is a very nice, deluxe (wait, isn't that the same thing?) water softener, and aside from me being to stupid to remember to add salt to it more often than once every six months, it's really a fine unit. Having said that, the unit's were installed in many of several large subdivisions constructed in San Antonio, Texas, during the 2003 - 2005 period. If you've never lived in or visited San Antonio, you wouldn't understand why water softeners are in such high demand here. We get water from the Edwards Aquifer, a huge underground, limestone lined water reservoir. So if any water is going to put it to the test, our's certainly will. Now having said all of these wonderful and marvelous things, I've also noted that almost every add-on option I had build in my house typically ran twice what it would have had I simply bought and installed or contracted installation instead of relying on the builder. Your buddy wisely mentioned that even if it was a nice unit it seemed wildly overpriced. Those were the words of not just a good friend, but a wise one at that. Again, the unit it very effective, but then, so are many other units at half the price. And if it's any indicator as to how satisfied customers are, well, the lack of any widespread info about the unit or the company after four years is probably a clue. Hope this info helps, or at least makes you feel better if you didn't buy one.
 
 

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