Eczema, soft water and salt free softeners.


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Old 12-29-05, 11:42 PM
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Question Eczema, soft water and salt free softeners.

I have two children with bad Eczema. I've had people say they've heard soft water helps. I'd like to know if anyone out there has actually experienced it helping with severe dry skin.

I've come across two brands that are "no-salt" with a couple of good user reviews - but you can't really trust a product's self-endorsements. Anybody have any experience with units manufactured by LifeSourcewww.lifesourcwater.com or Aquantum http://www.aquantum.com ? My main interest in the salt-free is easier maintainence and lower cost of operation.

Thanks for your opinions and experience.

C.
 
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Old 12-31-05, 12:42 PM
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I went to the LifeSourceWater site. I believe that is a complex filter systems, perhaps using activated carbon to remove chlorine and improve clarity, taste and odor using a timer backwashing valve. Its NSF-42 rating handles only the asthetics of the water. It won't soften your water and the same thing for a much lower price can be purchased locally.

The Aquantum site offers a so-called salt-free softener. I find it interesting that it is supposed to convert hard water into Calcite. First time I've heard that one. We use Calcite as a pH adjuster by raising the pH and elimniating (to a degree) acidic water to a more neutral pH. Adding Calcite to, say. water with a pH of 6 and hardness of 3 grains per gallon, will raise the pH to 7 but also raise the hardness to around 10...making the water actually harder. So go figure.

Also, a sequestering agent is NOT a softening device. Polyphosphates are a sequestering agent that is commonly used to make water 'appear' soft by holding the hardness minerals in suspension so that they do not adhere to pipes, glassware, etc., and allows soaps to lather more. Companies like P&G use these agents in their soaps because they market to the 85% (National Geological Society) of the homes, which have hard water. Good business sense.

Polyphosphates and many other chemical are that not biodegradable, last forever wherever they go.

Can you please describe better your concerns, worries, or aversions toward salt-based softeners? Perhaps a better understanding can help me guide you to an acceptable solution. Some people just can't lift the bags, or they have heard old wives' tales, or have extreme dietary restrictions. So please let us know.

Let us hear from you
Andy
 
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Old 12-31-05, 03:51 PM
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schlumpy,

There are many manufacturers that make groundless claims about their products and unfortunately water treatment is one of the largest areas where this occurs.
In professional and engineering circles, ion exchange water softeners, which are the type that use salt, are the only effective means of removing minerals.
I would suggest you do a search on reviews on the effectiveness of the those devices you mentioned.
Look for government, insurance and maybe court reports on the possibility the mfr's claims are groundless.

Here is a recent thread about magnetic water conditioning with a US Army report in PDF format on this type of product's innefectiveness.
 
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Old 01-01-06, 07:51 AM
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Here is an interesting web site that discusses different non-conventional technologies concerning water treatment.

http://www.chem1.com/CQ/gallery.html

I hope this helps.
Andy
 
 

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