How to up the PH in the water


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Old 01-09-07, 02:52 PM
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How to up the PH in the water

Recently we had our water tested. Water from the well tested at 5.3. Water from our faucet after being treated by a PH balancer and water softener is at 6. We have a PH neutralizer with a Fleck 1500 valve. I called the company that we bought the unit from. They said they will come out and maintain the unit. How will this up the PH in the water? Is there anyway we can up the PH ourself?
 
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Old 01-09-07, 06:50 PM
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neutralizer

The neutralizer uses a sacrificial media to neutralize the acid in the water. Media is either FOODGRADE Calcite or Corosex. The stuff is granular and comes in bags. You add the media either through a bung hole on the tank, or by removing the Fleckvalve... There should be a gravel bed in the tank... Big Box homecenters should have the stuff, maybe even Sears, since they sold neutralizers in the recent past.

When you buy the replacement media, tell them what your PH is, it may make difference on the grade of media you will require. Your PH is VERY low.
 
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Old 01-09-07, 07:42 PM
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We have been replacing the caltrite whenever it gets near the minimum line. Is this all that will be done on the service call? If it is, we can do this ourselves. (I just checked the caltrite level and it is near the minimum level. So, we will be replacing it before the guy comes.) Is there something else they will be doing?
 
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Old 01-09-07, 07:51 PM
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Serious answer...

Ask them what they will do, and what it will cost for them to do it. Go from there I guess. They certainly should be willing to answer your questions. I have a neutralizer, but I installed it myself--still fairly new and I haven't had to do anything to it yet.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 08:14 AM
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The company said they are going to add more neutralizer to the tank and that is it. But, this is a function that we do ourselves. I told the company that we will refill the tank and retest the water ourselves. If there is still a problem, then we will call them in. If we added the neutralizer and the PH is still low, what else can they do?

BTW, do you know of a moderately price PH testing unit? I have some dip stick type PH tester. The company that tested our water has an electronical unit which is more accurate. I don't want to have to call the water testing people to come in again.
 
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Old 01-10-07, 12:26 PM
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I am assuming that the AN is before the softener, right? ...and the softener and AN never backwash at the same time. What size pipe do youi have from the pressure tank to the AN? 3/4"--1"?

Between 6.0 and 6.8 we use Calcite; between 5.0 and 6.3 we use a mix of Calcite and magnesium oxide (20%);' below 5.0 we normally use a chemfeeder with soda ash, for example.

How big is your tank (diameter)? 10", 8"? It could be that water is traveling through the media too fast and not actually spending enough time finding its 7.0 range.

Because Calcite is approx. 100lbs/ft3., it is very heavy and needs a very high backwash flow rate--6-10gpm in a 10" tank--so that it doesn't solidify and form channels. If channels are formed, water passes through the path of least resistence and pH doesn't adequately rise. A dump-n-rebed may be necessary so simply 'adding' Calcite may not solve the problem.

There are ways to increase flow rate and backwash flowrate in particular. Don't underestimate the importance of this aspect with any backwashing filter, especially one with a heavy media.

Andy

You can pick up a pH test kit from any pool supply store and WalMarts in the summer season for 3-6 bucks
 

Last edited by AndyC; 01-10-07 at 12:32 PM. Reason: Addition
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Old 01-10-07, 02:13 PM
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AndyC,

My 10" AN backwashes every 3 days with a 15 mins@2.4g/min Backwash/Flush and then a 16 min@2.4g/min Rapid Rinse (Fleck 5600SE downflow).

Is this enough rinse? also is the schedule based on water usage (as we are low water users) or is it to stop the media creating the channels you mention?

We have(had) a pH of 6.0.

Thnks
 
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Old 01-11-07, 12:05 PM
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h15gus

I would say that your valve is based on a timer and not a demand usage. You should be able to see an additional component behind the valve tied into the in-out lines with a cable coming out of the top and into the valve. If one is there then it is a demand operated valve.

My feeling is that would be a little low for backwash rate. You are using about 70 gallons of water so the volume is OK. I'm just not sure the flow rate is adequate.

Ideally, you would want a pH level to be around 7.2-7.6 for residential applications on copper pipes.

The frequency is alright. I assume it is backashing at artound 2AM.

Andy
 
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Old 01-11-07, 05:37 PM
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My apologies for hijacking this thread.

I am not quite sure what my pH after the AN is - I will also try and find a test kit.

Yes, I am on a timer based backwash set for 2AM. It is a Fleck 5600SE valve - and I read/assumed 2.4 g/min. Perhaps I am wrong, as I havnt physically checked the flow.

The times are definitely as it is programmed 15/0/16/off.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 08:29 PM
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===>please see answers directly following your questions.

I am assuming that the AN is before the softener, right? ...and the softener and AN never backwash at the same time. What size pipe do youi have from the pressure tank to the AN? 3/4"--1"?
===> yes, AN is before the softener and backwashes are set to go on different days. backwash runs every three days. Pipe starts at 1 in but steps down to 3/4" by the time it reaches the AN. Then 3/4 to the softener.


Between 6.0 and 6.8 we use Calcite; between 5.0 and 6.3 we use a mix of Calcite and magnesium oxide (20%);' below 5.0 we normally use a chemfeeder with soda ash, for example.
===> what we get from the company is Calcite. Since we are 5.3 directly from the well, can we use the Calcite and magnesium oxide with our equipment?


How big is your tank (diameter)? 10", 8"? It could be that water is traveling through the media too fast and not actually spending enough time finding its 7.0 range.
====> 13" x 54" tall.

Because Calcite is approx. 100lbs/ft3., it is very heavy and needs a very high backwash flow rate--6-10gpm in a 10" tank--so that it doesn't solidify and form channels. If channels are formed, water passes through the path of least resistence and pH doesn't adequately rise. A dump-n-rebed may be necessary so simply 'adding' Calcite may not solve the problem.
====> how do we determine the backwash flow rate? FYI, calcite was near the minimum level when the 6.0 measurement was taken from the kitchen faucet. We added additional since then. Would this be enough to bring the PH up to 7?


There are ways to increase flow rate and backwash flowrate in particular. Don't underestimate the importance of this aspect with any backwashing filter, especially one with a heavy media.
===> what ways?
 

Last edited by Novice134; 01-17-07 at 05:30 AM.
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Old 01-17-07, 02:30 PM
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===> what we get from the company is Calcite. Since we are 5.3 directly from the well, can we use the Calcite and magnesium oxide with our equipment?


Yes, you can mixed mag oxide 20% and Calcite 80% in one tank. It increases the effects of pH balancing, but there is an additional cost and maintenance frequency.

====> 13" x 54" tall.

Wow, that is a big tank. The advantage to that is that water will travel through it more slowly, more contact time. But backwashing would be more difficult to lift the bed. Sometime 13" tanks are placed before the pressure tank as a flow though application without backwashing valves. This would be an upflow rather than downflow, though.

====> how do we determine the backwash flow rate? FYI, calcite was near the minimum level when the 6.0 measurement was taken from the kitchen faucet. We added additional since then. Would this be enough to bring the PH up to 7?

The manufacturer's specification will tell you flow rates, etc. The addition of Calcite should raise the pH. Remember, the slower the water passes through the media the more effective it will be. A 13" tank should be adequate for that prupose on normal household water use...

===> what ways to increase flow rates?

You change your 3/4" pipe to 1" pipe to the AN and then to the softener. But there may be ways to increase flow rate to the valve depending on make and model. I am not familiar with the 1500 features. Another way is to switch out the single 13" and replace it with two 10" tanks. They backwash at different times but at a beeter rate. Probably not a like scenerio, though.

You could also switch the chemical feeder, but that is a whole 'nother system.

Calcite is both the generic and registered name of the media. Sort of the Kleenex of the water treatment industry.

Thanks,
Andy
 
 

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