Under the sink water filter


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Old 05-01-07, 11:48 AM
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Under the sink water filter

Hello all,

I currently have on of those filters that attaches directly to the water faucet. It's kind of a pain in the butt, because it's big and bulky. It has activated charcoal in it to reduce chlorine, in addition to a sediment filter. It's a vey slow filter, but gives very clean water. Can I get a hook-up for under the sink that will give me similar results without being so slow.

P.S. I'm not looking to go with an R.O. filter just yet.

Thanx

Jim
 
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Old 05-01-07, 12:01 PM
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For quality undersink filters and good info here's a great place to start...

http://www.pwgazette.com/uf.htm

You have to "copy and paste" as HTML is turned off on this forum

Good undersink filters usally require a seperate faucet like an RO uses. Give those people a call and tell them what you want to do.

You need to make sure the filter won't restrict the flow.
 
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Old 05-01-07, 03:03 PM
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Oh I see, so you can't just open the faucet on your sink and get this ultra-pure water right out of the tap at an unrestricted flow rate.

OK I guess I could live with an additional spigot mounted on my sink, it has to be better than that annoying thing attached to the faucet.

I did read some info on that site and and annual or bi-annual fiter change is not bad at all.

I mean I want to fill a pot of water for pasta and it takes 10mins. to fill with the one I have. It's not even worth it for other than a small glass of water.

Thanx for the info.

Jim
 
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Old 05-01-07, 03:22 PM
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Those faucet mounted filters restrict the flow BIG TIME.

We have an RO (along with a water softener) that delivers at an OK flow but my wife has a system that she seems to like.

She bought 2 really nice water jugs at Wal-Mart by Rubbermaid and keeps them under the kitchen sink filled with RO water. When it comes time to fill the big pasta pot she uses the water in the jugs and refills them at her leisure.

If you do think an RO is in your future then why not put the money you'd spend on a good filter towards that RO?
 
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Old 05-01-07, 06:56 PM
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Yeah was thinking along those lines. Will I be able to disconnect it fairly easily and take it with me when I move in a few years?

Thanx for the advice.

Jim
 
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Old 05-01-07, 07:34 PM
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Jim,

Whether you choose an undersink filter or an RO DON'T, and I repeat, DON'T use a "saddle" valve for the feed water. Plumb it in with a proper "T" or change out the angle stop for a double output and you can disconnect and take it away easily.

If you get an RO and use it to feed your icemaker use PE (polyethelene) tubing and not copper from the RO to the icemaker.
 
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Old 05-01-07, 08:39 PM
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I take it "saddle" valve is one of those things that you clamp on the pipe and make a perforation. And just curious, why PE and not copper to the ice maker. (For future reference).

Thanx
Jim
 
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Old 05-01-07, 09:10 PM
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Yes, saddle valves are the "piercers". They are not code approved in many places. They are unreliable and there's no removing them when they fail cause the hole remains.

RO water is very aggressive since it's been stripped of practically everything except the "H" and the "O". It will leach copper from the tubing. Just use "PE" tubing approved fro potable water and there's no problem.
 
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Old 05-01-07, 10:43 PM
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I wouldn't want to use one of those piercers anyway. Like you said if they leak you're kinda screwed.

I've heard some stories about RO water myself. At the power plant I worked at, someone used RO (boiler) water to brew coffee one morning and gave everyone diareah. LOL

Thanx again for all the info

Jim
 
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Old 05-01-07, 11:06 PM
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Jim,

I don't know about "boiler water" but I've been drinking, cooking, making ice cubes and coffee with RO water for over 10 years with no ill effects.

In fact in tnose 10+ years I haven't had to descale a coffeemaker.
 
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Old 05-02-07, 09:22 PM
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Actually I think they treat the boiler water with something(sodium sulphate I think)very tiny amount and some unknowing moron thought he was gunna brew some good coffee. LOL

Yeah I'm just getting really tired of the city water around here. I feel like gagging sometimes when I drink a glass of water.
The scale is not such a big problem here, but the clorine and foul taste in general is.

Approximately how long will an RO unit last before it needs servicing? How many gals. from your average setup?
 
 

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