Pink slime


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Old 05-05-07, 06:09 AM
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Pink slime

We are having a problem with pink slime showing up everywhere water has a tendency to stand (shower floor, cup used for watering plants, etc.) We know (EPA website) we have unacceptable levels of chlorine by-products in our drinking water and have resorted to hauling in purified drinking water.

We are looking at a whole house water purification system, as "allergies" runs rampant in our household. What components should I look for in a system? Is anyone familiar with the Whirlpool Central Water Filtration System sold at Lowe's?
 
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Old 05-05-07, 08:52 AM
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Might this be bacterial iron? What does the inside of your toilet tank look like, not the bowl? Slimey residue on walls?

Are you on well water?

You might want to find a water lab and bring or send samples for organic and inorganic substances.

Don't know about Lowes Whirlpool system.

Off hand, I would think you should get 3 - 5 well guys or water professionals out to your casa and let them do some preliminary testing, while you are doing research and waiting for replies.
 
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Old 05-05-07, 09:16 AM
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Get an independent water test done through the local health department to determine what is in your water and what needs to be done before getting estimates from companies that sell water filters and purifiers. The water test will tell you if your water has any unacceptable levels of contaminants.

Pink is a common color for bacteria such as pseudomonas and flavobacterium. Bacteria and molds grow well in moist environments, such as showers and tubs and sink drains. Humidifiers and high humidity can encourage mold growth. Bacteria and mold spores are everywhere in the air, soil, water, or on household surfaces. When the right conditions such as moisture or high humidity and poor ventilation occur, they tend to settle in. The best control for slime is to keep surfaces clean and disinfected.

Check humidity level in the home with a hygrometer (sold where thermometers are sold). Humidity will vary among rooms, with bathroom, kitchen, and laundry usually being higher. Humidity inside the home should be maintained between 35-55% year round. If humidity is high, turn off humidifiers and run dehumidifiers. Run fans to improve air circulation. Run vent/fan in bathroom during bathing and at least 20 minutes afterwards to exhaust humid air. Do the same in the kitchen when cooking.

If your family suffers from allergies, maintaining the humidity level is very important. Basements and bathrooms and other damp areas are often sources of mold and musty odors due to high humidity. Don't forget to change your air filter. Use a vacuum with a HEPA filter on carpets and upholstery. Consider replacing carpet with wood, vinyl, or tile, especially in bedrooms where allergy sufferers spend most of their time. Mattresses, box springs, and pillows can be covered with allergen impermeable covers. Children's stuffed animals can often be a source of dust mite allergens and should be limited in number and wiped with damp cloth to minimize dust. Pet dander can be a problem for allergy sufferers. If willing to make some changes inside the home, you can minimize allergens.
 
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Old 05-05-07, 09:26 AM
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Iron bacteria can be a problem in well water. It should not be confused with iron dissolved in water that causes red water and stains on clothing and plumbing fixtures. Iron bacteria does not cause disease, but it produces a reddish-brown slime in pipes and pumps. In toilet tanks it will produce a rainbow slick on the surface.
 
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Old 05-08-07, 11:50 AM
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Just a guess, but..."unacceptable levels of chlorine by-products in our drinking water and have resorted to hauling in purified drinking water." would lead me to believe he's talking about city water. I've got the pink slime thing going on as well, and it is from too much ammonia being put into the chloramine process. And, no, the whirlpool won't do the job.
 
 

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