SST-60 Resin


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Old 09-28-07, 11:18 PM
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SST-60 Resin

So after spending a considerable time here on this forum, I decided to purchase a 48k grain softener, SST-60 Resin, Fleck 7000 control and now am awaiting a plumber call back to get me up and running.

After reading about the benefits of the SST-60 Resin, I decided to purchase said resin for salt-efficiency purposes as I have little iron in the system needing removal.

My question is, now that I have the set-up, how do I take advantage of this salt efficiency, do I set the GPG down from 8 to 4, do I shorten the brine draw/slow rinse to 30 minutes (from 60)?

Also, Im sure that this applies to sodium, but if I use potassium, since its less 'efficient' anyway, do I just leave the settings the same?

Thanks in advance for your help.
 
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Old 09-29-07, 01:41 PM
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Sst-60

The key to SST-60 is the uniform exchange area on each bead that helps it act like a UPS column. The beads are also very strung, so they have a greater degree of chlorine resistance than traditional gel resins. Leakage is also very low.

SST-60 behaves best when regenerated upflow in a packed column. When regenerated downflow, you can still get some great salt efficiencies.

The following data will be helpful in determining the best programming profile for your system.

Influent hardness, pH, iron level, TDS
Household water pressure
Maximum flow rate availale to system

Potassium is less active than potassium, so once you have your profile worked out, you just derate your capacity to accommodate for the KCl.

I'm curious, did the merchant who sold you this setup provide any programming information at all for the application ?
 
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Old 09-30-07, 07:44 PM
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Reply to Your Response

Inflow Hardness 7 GPG
ph 7.0
Iron Level 0.5 ppm

I do not have a TDS reading nor water pressure but available flow rate 15 gpm

Ohiopurewater sold me the system, I have yet to receive a callback/feedback from their "setup" hotline or emails despite everyone seeming to like that company overall.
 
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Old 09-30-07, 09:19 PM
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Sst-60

The following profile should work fine to start with, presuming you have a 0.5 gpm BLFC and a DLFC between 2.0 & 8.0 :-

U--1
dF
7--3
C-48
H-9
2:00
A--14
1-10
2-75
3--5
4-10
5-10
F-82
cF-30
LF60

Let it run for a week and then test your effluent water - hot & cold.

We can fine tune it at that point to make it even more efficient.
 
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Old 10-01-07, 12:08 AM
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Thanks

Thanks for the prompt reply. Sorry to be a 'whats that' person but can you explain why you changed the settings necessarily. I find the softening thing quite interesting and would be interested why you chose the things to change at this time.

For example, I noticed you changed the 'safety factor' off its default, why, what does it even do?

Hardness up from 7 to 9, Im assuming to remove the iron?

If variable brining is such a great feature of this valve, why does it seem I can find no one who uses it?

Thanks, I appreciate it.
 
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Old 10-01-07, 04:09 PM
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SST-60 - 7000 Valve - Variable Brining

Good questions, nothing to be sorry about


This is a very safe "plain vanilla" profile, just to get started and see how the resin performs in your installation.

When you go for bleeding edge performance optimization, one needs a lot of data to program the system properly. Since we don't have all the requisite data, you need to do a little bit of trial & error.

We'll incorporate the variable brining later, but for now we need to see if the resin is up to the task at these lean salting levels before we get too creative.

cF - Safety compensation factor is used to derate the capacity of the media, based on the salting level. cF-30 means that the controller will derate the capacity by 30%.

If you look at spec. sheets of various resins, you'll see your salting efficiency curves, which show (under ideal conditions) how the resin will react to various brine dosages.



9gpg hardness is indeed to compensate both for iron and potentially other ions that could be attracted to the resin.


Any questions are welcome, just let me know what else you'd like to know.
 
 

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