New Well, brain gone complete circle


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Old 10-11-07, 07:22 PM
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New Well, brain gone complete circle

The short story - we put in a new well, got **lots** of water, but the iron content is a killer. (I accused the driller of finding a '54 Buick down there...)
Test revealed: (mg/L)
Fluoride
 
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Old 10-11-07, 09:13 PM
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Well water - low pH

That doesn't sound too scary. I don't like your pH though, it' way too low.

The following would be a good start:-

Self-backwashing pH neutralizer
Iron filter
Water Softener/Conditioner

I'm presume that your well pressure is at least 50psi to ensure adequate backwash
 
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Old 10-12-07, 06:29 AM
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More info

Thanks, Greg.
The Aqua-Pure APIR series "removes up to 10-ppm of Iron, while simultaneously correcting low pH". I thought the best approach would be to follow this with a NFS100 Softener. I question wheather of not I can use Potassium Chloride in the NFS100 to get the job done - or have I selected the wrong item for the job..??
I should have said need is for up to 4 adults on weekends, no lawn or gardens.

-W.
 
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Old 10-12-07, 01:13 PM
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Apir

I'm not a fan of the APIR's methodology. My experience with "aspirator" air injection systems hasn't been the best - leaks and clogging issues.

Others might have had better experience with them - just my $0.02

Potassium chloride salt is not a problem in the NFS100, just remember to derate your capacity by 10%.
 
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Old 10-14-07, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by greg-cws View Post
I'm not a fan of the APIR's methodology. My experience with "aspirator" air injection systems hasn't been the best - leaks and clogging issues.

Others might have had better experience with them - just my $0.02

Potassium chloride salt is not a problem in the NFS100, just remember to derate your capacity by 10%.
Thanks Greg - I didn't see the "Aspirator" reference in the literature until you pointed it out.
Would a "Green sand" filter be a more appropriate choice for the iron removal? The combination of hard water + iron seems to be an issue for some filter types.
Thanks, Will
 
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Old 10-14-07, 08:49 PM
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Greensand

MTM is a great composite media manufactured by Clack that is generally used instead of Greensand these days. It oxidizes iron just like greensand, but is much lighter so it is very easy to backwash and is less susciptible to channeling.

I'd suggest a 1ft3 MTM system with a Fleck 7000 valve (32mm riser - high flow piston) to drive it. That will give great flow with low pressure drops and provide excellent iron removal with relatively low KMnO4 consumption.

You can use the same style system for your pH neutralization, except use a blend of Calcite & Corosex.

Don't worry about your septic system. If it has a well-designed leach field, you'll have great results for many years
 
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Old 10-15-07, 06:56 AM
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Greg,
Am I missing something obvious here? Are most (all?) backwashing filters "generic", and the user fills them with the medium of choice? I have no experience with any filter system, so I am trying to educate myself enough so that I don't buy the WRONG thing(s).
Should I purchase two backwashing filters, load one with "MTM" and the second with a blend of Calcite & Corosex?
 
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Old 10-15-07, 05:42 PM
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Filters

A little explanation would probably be helpful, wouldn't it ?

Backwashing filters all operate similarly, whether purchased from a branded retailer, an independent or if you build it yourself.

Obviously, DIY usually is the "cheapest" option if you don't need pro. support or someone to warranty their workmanship/design.

Regardless of how you have it built, a self-backwashing filter will contain the following elements:-

- Media tank
- Control valve assembly
- Riser & distribution system
- Media
- Underbedding

Tanks are all pretty much the same, just make sure it is NSF certified and preferably made in the USA.

Control valves vary. There are a few good manufacturers and a few bad ones too. I'm personally partial to the Fleck/Pentair 7000 series controllers for applications up to 1.25" ID pipe size, due to their reliebility, performance and Pentair's great warranty service. - Others might have their own favorite.

Risers and distributors are generally similar. For the 7000 valve, the 32mm riser will give you good flows.

Media will vary from application to application, as needed

Underbedding should always be NSF-approved food-grade gravel (sounds funny, doesn't it ?)
 
 

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