PH Neutralizer Overflow


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Old 10-25-07, 11:37 AM
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PH Neutralizer Overflow

I am very appreciative of this forum and find there are some very knowledgabe posters so thank you.
I am wondering if there are any water treatment professionals out there that have dealt with the problem of filling a PH Neutralizing with Calcite leaving a good 12" freeboard, backwashing ofr a good 15 minutes before leaving and still having the material go up and into plumbing creating a big mess a week after the fill up?
I do know that the customer (who is now sueing me in small claims court) had very high water pressure 70-80psi and no regulating device on the lines.
Any comments on this subject would be appreciated.
 
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Old 10-25-07, 11:58 AM
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What size is the plumbing going into the unit? Describe the lines before and after the unit. Size of house...# of baths, users, etc.

What is the pH before and after the unit?

Are you willing to recifiy it at some cost your business? A lawsuit is the last thing you want, especially, if you lose. What are his (her) issues?

Consider adding a post filter housing with a softener distributor in it and a drain plug/valve after the unit.

Andy Christensen, CWS-II
 
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Old 10-25-07, 01:21 PM
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Media through home

Have you inspected the riser assembly to confirm if the bottom basket is broken ?

If the bottom basket is broken, send the entire assembly to your manufacturer (after taking photographs) and have them do a failure analysis to determine the cause of failure.

If high pressure caused the failure, it is a homeowner's insurance issue. Not your fault.

If you cut your riser too long or bent the riser during assembly and broke the bottom basket, then it is your liability.

You should always have your customer install a PRV for their own protection. If they won't install a PRV, make them sign a liability waiver to protect you from their negligence.
 
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Old 10-26-07, 08:07 AM
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The unit I refer to is in an old house with 5 or 6 bedrooms (although I'm not sure why this is relevant). The pipe size is 3/4". How many service people remove the riser before refilling a neutralizer? That would mean rebedding each time.
I do know that a pressure of 70-80 psi was reached during backwash because I came back to look at the situation.
Also, the calcite worked its way about 30-40 feet from the unit, can this happen after 1 or 2 backwashes or could this have been happening for several months?
 
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Old 10-26-07, 11:14 AM
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Inspecting a riser

Inspecting the riser is an "after failure" analysis.

You have a system that has sent calcite through a home.
A broken riser is the most obvious reason for that.


Have you inspoected the riser ?
 
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Old 10-29-07, 10:27 AM
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I have'n't been able to check riser as I'm being sued by the client. I'm trying to find out if so much material(20-30LB ) could have made its way 30-40ft along sewer line after one refill.
 
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Old 10-29-07, 09:01 PM
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Clarification

In your original post, you said the media went though the house plumbing, which I presumed to be the potable water plumbing (faucets, fixtures etc...).

Did it actually go into the sewer drain instead ?

If it was in the sewer, how did they find it and what are they sueing you for ?
 
 

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