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salt vs. non-salt water softener?


chrisannie's Avatar
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10-25-07, 02:43 PM   #1 (permalink)  
salt vs. non-salt water softener?

Hi,

Could anyone tell us more about the difference bentween the salt and non-salt water softeners? What is your suggestion and why? We wanted to buy a salt one until a plumber told us the non-salt water softener can clean the mess that the hard water left. But we cannot find enough info on the internet about the non-salt one. Really need some advice from the experts here. Could you also suggest some models, please? Thanks.

Regards,

Annie

 
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10-25-07, 08:44 PM   #2 (permalink)  
Salt free softeners

All modern ion exchange water softeners physically remove calcium & magnesium from water and function on generally the same principle - exchanging ionic contaminants in water for sodium or potassium ions (not salt).

This proven technology has been used in residential, commercial and industrial applications for well for over 100 years and continues to be refined by various manufacturers to be progressively more efficient, economical and reliable.

The performance of ion exchange softeners can easily be verified by testing for the presence or absence of calcium ions in product water.

A number of companies sell “salt-free water softeners” touting numerous benefits, most notably their ability to perform as good or better than a real water softener and to even descale plumbing pipes.

The scientific basis for the ability of these devices to “soften” water is disputed by numerous industry leaders and academics and is often referred to as “pseudo-science”, since it is so difficult to prove that they actually work consistently in the same conditions as a traditional water softener.

There is no independent testing standard by which a homeowner can test the ability of their “salt-free” system to actually soften the water, because these systems do not remove calcium or magnesium (hardness) from water.

Since these systems do not remove hardness minerals from water, calling them a softener is likely to confuse consumers into believing they are going to enjoy the full benefits of water that has no inorganic calcium or magnesium when in fact their water will have the same amount of hardness minerals as untreated city water.

Certifications on these systems by the Water Quality Association pertain to the ability of the product to address chlorine taste & odor, not hardness.

References to certifications on websites and in sales literature are vague enough that a consumer might be misled into believing that the system is certified to actually soften the water, which is not true.

When comparing technologies, these companies frequently claim that traditional water softeners add salt to the water. This is simply not the case and this statement appears to be crafted to mislead the consumer into believing that dangerous sodium chloride salt is introduced into softened water, when only sodium or potassium electrolytes are introduced at very low levels.

I have never seen a "salt-free softener" that actually works as claimed.

 
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10-26-07, 02:02 PM   #3 (permalink)  
Thank you so much for your reply. We really appreicate it. Going to get the Ultima System that has 32,000 grains in it and uses the Fleck 5600 meter volve. We have 2 full bath and 4 people. I guess it should be good enough, right?

 
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10-26-07, 03:39 PM   #4 (permalink)  
Ultima

Is that from B&R Industries ?

How hard is your water ?

 
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10-26-07, 09:06 PM   #5 (permalink)  
Yes, Greg. It is from B&R Industries. Seems like you know this company,huh? Do they have good softeners?

The water hardness here is 17. Does the 48,000 grains one fit our house better? Thank you so much for the adivce.

Annie

 
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10-26-07, 11:22 PM   #6 (permalink)  
Ultima

B&R sells mainly in the southwest where hardness levels will fluctuate seasonally. If you live in the southwest, I'd go for the 48Kgr to get the best results.

 
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10-27-07, 02:56 PM   #7 (permalink)  
Thank you for your reply. Yes, we live in the southwest. We will follow your suggestion and get the 48,000 grains. Really appricate your advice.

Annie

 
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