Culligan Iron Soft Plus System - Really work??


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Old 10-31-07, 06:19 AM
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Culligan Iron Soft Plus System - Really work??

In order to correct an iron bacteria problem in my well water, I am considering a Culligan Iron Soft Plus softener that uses "zeolite" crystals. Supposedly this is a "self-chlorinating" system, rather than having to have a separate chlorination system. Does anyone know if this really works and if it is worth $2800????
 
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Old 10-31-07, 08:32 AM
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Bacterial iron is a slime. Do you see this in your toilet tank?

As far as I can tell, only superchlorination of your well and plumbing can control iron slime.

Zeolite is used for removal of dissolved iron. aka ferrous, clear or soluble iron.
 
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Old 10-31-07, 09:08 AM
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Bacterial Iron

YaddaYadda is exactly right.

Have you had your water tested ?
 
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Old 10-31-07, 09:18 AM
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Iron Soft Plus

The Iron Soft Plus system is a licensed version of another OEM system and is actually quite decent.

It uses zeolite instead of gel-based resin, so it doesn't do a very good job on hardness salt efficiency, but the self sanitization feature is quite nifty.

They use electrolysis to create hypoclorous acid which disinfects the system.

I wouldn't use it to address bacterial iron though, since there is no downstream chlorine residual.



Originally Posted by diyjim69580 View Post
In order to correct an iron bacteria problem in my well water, I am considering a Culligan Iron Soft Plus softener that uses "zeolite" crystals. Supposedly this is a "self-chlorinating" system, rather than having to have a separate chlorination system. Does anyone know if this really works and if it is worth $2800????
 
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Old 10-31-07, 09:30 AM
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Thanks, Greg. The "downstream chlorine residual" was a question I had, too, but does a regular chlorination system produce this or is all the chlorine removed by the softener before going downstream? Culligan said they would flush all the interior plumbing with chlorine before installing the system, presumably to kill all the iron bacteria.

I have slime in the toilet tanks and have had my water tested a couple of times recently (Kinetico and Culligan -- RainSoft is coming tomorrow).

Is it possible to replace the gel-based resin in my present (RainSoft) softener with zeolite rather than buying a whole new softener?
 
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Old 10-31-07, 09:56 AM
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Residual Chlorine

A traditional chlorinator (liquid or drop feed) will create that residual we're talking about.

Chlorinating the house plumbing is very important to get a clean start. If you have iron bacteria in the home, an acid-based disinfectant/detergent is good to trun through the plumbing first to attack the biofilm, followed by a high pH detergent to lift it off as much as possible before you chlorinate.

The softener will interact with chlorine in the water, causing the free chlorine to drop slightly, depending on how much damage the chlorine causes to the resin. There still will be some chlorine left behind.

In situations like this, I like to know some basic parameters to get a holistic view of the problem:- hardness, pH, TDS, Alkalinity, iron levels etc...

Post those if you've got them so that we can make sure we cover all the bases.
 
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Old 10-31-07, 12:08 PM
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Here is what I can piece together:

Raw water:
Hardness: 9 GPG
Iron: 3 RPM
pH: 7.4-8.0
TDS: 1200?
Sulfur: .1 PPM


Softened water:
Hardness: 4 GPG
Iron: 1.0 RPM
pH: 7.0-7.3
TDS: 1200 (200 after R.O.)
Sulfur: ?
 
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Old 10-31-07, 02:23 PM
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High TDS

That high TDS level is troubling in perspective of the other data listed.

How did they test for TDS, was it electronic or through dehydration ?

If that is 3.0ppm of iron, it is high enough to cause significant staining and discoloration.

Are you noticing staining/discoloration anywhere else inside or outside the home ?

The sulfur reading, is that referring to sulfate or hydrogen sulfide ?
 
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Old 10-31-07, 05:55 PM
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The TDS was electronic, I think. I little hand held gizmo with a meter on it.

Yes we get some staining -- not too much since we installed the softener (10 yrs. ago), but some.

I am pretty sure the sulfur reading is from hydrogen sulfide.
 
 

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