whirlpool gold central water filtration system


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Old 11-10-07, 12:55 PM
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whirlpool gold central water filtration system

I just saw this for the first time. Haven;t seen such a filter quite like this used for residential water supply before and was curious if anybody has any knowledge of it or the methods incorporated. good? Bad?

Whirlpool Gold Central Water Filtration System
 
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Old 11-11-07, 07:48 AM
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10 lbs of activated carbon plus 5 lbs of filtering sand and 6 lbs of gravel on the bottom.

Better minds than mine will comment on this..............but I would get a 4x20 inch BigBlue housing and a carbon filter in lieu of this item.

This apparently is to rid your water of any chlorine taste, only.
 
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Old 11-11-07, 02:18 PM
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I had just seen this thing at Lowes while there and curious as to anybody's input on it.

I thought that activated charcoal could not be readily cleaned by simply flushing and that is what this unit uses to "clean" its' media. If the charcoal is not rinsable, then it seems to be a bigger waste and hassle than first glance hints at.
 
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Old 11-12-07, 03:48 PM
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For the money, you're better off getting a 9x40 tank and a mechanical fleck valve which can be converted to backwash only. That's what I've done. Filled with 1cf of carbon. The backwash is really there to rebed the carbon to cut down on channeling. If you're city water has chloramine as most water supplies have centaur carbon is needed, which will not only remove chlorine but also chloramine. As for what else carbon does besides improving the taste, it will work to remove voc's, a whole slew of which remain in your water even after treatment at the city plant.
 
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Old 11-13-07, 03:13 PM
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It is essentially the world's cheapest (you determine the nuance) softenr converted to a backwashing filter.

CAG media can be backwashed and there is some advantage to that as it will rid much of the sediment that it has collected leaving the carbon surface to adsorb more later. But its shelflife is still quite limited to the amount of water being used, the chemicals it is removing and the frequency of its backwashing.

I agree that a quality, desposible filter may prove as worthy and more cost effective.

Andy Christensen, CWS-II
 
 

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