Culligan Mark 100 system not softening but regenerates nightly


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Old 01-07-08, 05:19 AM
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Culligan Mark 100 system not softening but regenerates nightly

We definitely have hard water - 11 gpg. The system was installed in 2000. I've never used iron-out but I recall there was iron in the water. And with my water, the toilet bowls turn rusty-looking after a while with the hard water. When the water is soft, this doesn't happen at all.

The system regenerates nightly. I don't recall it doing that in the past. The salt level doesn't change though but I hear it. We got a water bill that said that we used 99000 gallons in 91 days. Even at 100 gallons per day for the 5 people in our house, there's no way we used an average of 1000 gallons per day except maybe because the system regenerates every night and uses water but doesn't replace the hard for the soft.

I checked the tube that the float is attached to and water comes through it just fine. I did a search and see posts about cleaning the venturi but I don't know what it looks like. I also saw a passing mention about a service pack but can't find that particular post where it's located.

Can somebody give me an idea of where the venturi is and what other things that I need to check? I bought some iron-out to put into the system but I haven't put it in yet because I want to make sure that I've cleared all blockages and checked everything else first.

Thanks.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 10:03 AM
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You have hard water with iron and you have a softener. That's good. Hopefully the softener is sized and featured correctly to treat your hardness and the iron.

You have iron in the water but haven't been using iron out. Bad.

The salt level doesn't change. Bad

The system regenerates nightly. VERY bad and wastes a lot of water

Sounds like you may have fouled the resin and probably have a salt bridge in the brine tank along with other possible problems.

Culligan softeners are proprietary. No parts or service literature is available to end users so...

hey Culligan man (woman).

Give Culligan a call and get them to come out and give you an estimate to repair your softener. If you consider the price reasonable then do it. Pay attention to what they do and you'll learn a lot. Ask the tech to explain to you what routine maintenance you should be doing.

Whatever it costs, the will be money well spent and will save you a fortune on your water bill.

If you feel the price is too high then shop for a new industry standard softener from a local independent water treatment professional. Avoid Sears, HD, Lowes, and the like.
 

Last edited by justalurker; 01-07-08 at 10:59 AM.
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Old 01-07-08, 03:26 PM
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Thanks for your reply. A salt bridge is definitely not it; I thought that was it initially and have emptied the brine tank and cleaned it out a few times.

I'll see how much they charge to repair it. I know they charge an arm and a leg to replace the RO filters - $160+ so it may not be worth it since we're moving this summer. I certainly can't increase the sales price of my house just because I have a softener.

If I fouled the resin, will the Iron-Out "unfoul" it?
 
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Old 01-07-08, 03:34 PM
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Originally Posted by GodMadeMePretty View Post
Thanks for your reply. A salt bridge is definitely not it; I thought that was it initially and have emptied the brine tank and cleaned it out a few times.

I'll see how much they charge to repair it. I know they charge an arm and a leg to replace the RO filters - $160+ so it may not be worth it since we're moving this summer. I certainly can't increase the sales price of my house just because I have a softener.

If I fouled the resin, will the Iron-Out "unfoul" it?
I guess I wasn't clear...

Regenerating every night means the softener's control valve is broken. Until that is taken care of fouled resin doesn't matter. If the resin is fouled then sometimes, and I mean sometimes, the resin can be cleared but that requires that the softener is operating correctly in order to do that.

With 11g hard water I'd think a properly operating softener providing quality water to the people, the plumbing, and appliances would be an asset to the house.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 03:51 PM
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Funny thing

I just looked in the tank a couple of days ago and the salt that I had put in months ago was still there. I looked in the tank just now and the salt level has gone down, but the water is not soft. I even see where the salt is dissolving. Where could the soft water be going?
 
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Old 01-07-08, 04:08 PM
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Originally Posted by GodMadeMePretty View Post
I just looked in the tank a couple of days ago and the salt that I had put in months ago was still there. I looked in the tank just now and the salt level has gone down, but the water is not soft. I even see where the salt is dissolving. Where could the soft water be going?
I will repeat myself one last time... "regenerating every night means the softener's control valve is broken".

Good luck.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 08:12 PM
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Originally Posted by justalurker View Post
I will repeat myself one last time... "regenerating every night means the softener's control valve is broken".

Good luck.
Wow! So snippy.

Don't think I don't really appreciate your response. I do. However, you were NOT clear in your initial response. You did NOT say that the control valve was broken. You said
Sounds like you may have fouled the resin and probably have a salt bridge in the brine tank along with other possible problems.
Since I'm NOT a water softener professional, "possible problems" does not automatically equate with a broken control valve. I did not infer that from your response.

I have an Aqua Sensor so that may have something to do with the constant regeneration because it is "sensing" that there is hard water so it regenerates (got that from the culligan man).

As for repeating yourself again - I hadn't read your second reply before I posted again. I'm just now seeing it - which is why I sound snippy like you did. I didn't think that asking a general knowledge question about the fouling of the resin would garner such snippiness. That question was for my own personal edification.

I'm going to check to see if I have a plugged eductor nozzle per the Culligan man before I call in for a repairperson.

Thanks for your time.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 08:36 PM
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GodMadeMePretty,

Most people that come to these forums asking for FREE help appreciate those who give their time and knowledge trying to provide the FREE help they seek. There are always those who don't want to learn and don't want to listen and don't want to pay a professional when they should, but they rarely levy a personal attack at the people who try to help them.

I apologize that I was unable to effect a satisfactory and timely FREE repair of your softener over the wire based on your sketchy, vague, and incomplete description of the hardware and the symptoms. Perhaps if you had moved your softener closer to the keyboard so I could have seen it I would have been more effective.

I will try to do better in the future.
 

Last edited by justalurker; 01-07-08 at 10:20 PM.
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Old 01-08-08, 01:10 AM
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Originally Posted by justalurker View Post
GodMadeMePretty,

I will try to do better in the future.
Please do. This is a DIY forum. If you don't want to give FREE advice - don't. If I can't DIMyself, I will hire a professional. Always have but I actually like trying to do things myself - hence my presence on this forum.
 
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Old 01-08-08, 07:57 AM
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Just a thought...been in real estate for many years either selling, a Realtor, and now investor. You MUST disclose that this is not working properly, or you will face penalties. Penalties such as a lawsuit, fines, etc. Been there, seen it, done that. I know. Get it fixed. Probably less than $500. How can you NOT justify that, now knowing what I said in the first two sentences. And as for the guys in this forum being "snippy": yes, they tend to be trigger-happy to recommend a professional in a DIY forum. They should, at the very least, provide you with some level of DIY testing to assure you that a professional is needed. But since a Culligan is proprietary, you can't get parts anyway. So why waste your time. You know it's broke. You know it'll cost you if you don't get it fixed. So, in the words of Dr. Laura, go do what's right!!!
 
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Old 01-08-08, 09:01 AM
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Originally Posted by mabulok View Post
yes, they tend to be trigger-happy to recommend a professional in a DIY forum.
That happens when the OP demonstrates that they expect a silver bullet solution and lack the knowledge, tools, patience, or inclination to learn to help themselves.

Originally Posted by mabulok View Post
They should, at the very least, provide you with some level of DIY testing to assure you that a professional is needed.
Many knowledgeable and skilled techs in many fields do "how" questions and not "why" questions. "Why" questions are best handled by educators. People who are techs for a living rarely take the time to ponder the philosophical side of thier field because they are compensated by how quickly or how many units are attended to.

Originally Posted by mabulok View Post
But since a Culligan is proprietary, you can't get parts anyway. So why waste your time. You know it's broke.
See my original reply to the OP... "Culligan softeners are proprietary. No parts or service literature is available to end users so..." and in my second reply I said "I guess I wasn't clear".

People who take the time to answer questions and share their experience and knowledge on these forums do so because they want to. They are not required to and the people asking the questions are not entitled to the information in any way and should be grateful that anyone will take the time to help them and not, in rare instances, complain when they don't get the answers they want or like the answers they get.

As for recommending professionals... it is often readily apparent from the OP's first post whether or not they have the skills to attempt to help themselves. Being too lazy to look at the stickies or search the forum for an answer to a question that has been asked a hundred times and starting a new thread just to serve themselves usually indicates that one wants others to do it for them rather than learn to do it themselves.

There are FAR more people receiving the help they ask for on these forums than there are people not getting the help they demand.
 
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Old 01-08-08, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by justalurker View Post
That happens when the OP demonstrates that they expect a silver bullet solution and lack the knowledge, tools, patience, or inclination to learn to help themselves.



Many knowledgeable and skilled techs in many fields do "how" questions and not "why" questions. "Why" questions are best handled by educators. People who are techs for a living rarely take the time to ponder the philosophical side of thier field because they are compensated by how quickly or how many units are attended to.



See my original reply to the OP... "Culligan softeners are proprietary. No parts or service literature is available to end users so..." and in my second reply I said "I guess I wasn't clear".

People who take the time to answer questions and share their experience and knowledge on these forums do so because they want to. They are not required to and the people asking the questions are not entitled to the information in any way and should be grateful that anyone will take the time to help them and not, in rare instances, complain when they don't get the answers they want or like the answers they get.

As for recommending professionals... it is often readily apparent from the OP's first post whether or not they have the skills to attempt to help themselves. Being too lazy to look at the stickies or search the forum for an answer to a question that has been asked a hundred times and starting a new thread just to serve themselves usually indicates that one wants others to do it for them rather than learn to do it themselves.

There are FAR more people receiving the help they ask for on these forums than there are people not getting the help they demand.
Not necessary to bash me too. I was agreeing with you.
 
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Old 01-08-08, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by mabulok View Post
Not necessary to bash me too. I was agreeing with you.
Originally Posted by mabulok View Post
And as for the guys in this forum being "snippy": yes, they tend to be trigger-happy to recommend a professional in a DIY forum. They should, at the very least, provide you with some level of DIY testing to assure you that a professional is needed.
Didn't seem like you were agreeing with me but rather agreeing with the OP about the guys on the forum who are "snippy" and "trigger-happy to recommend a professional" but try to help those that ask for it.

I wasn't bashing you in any way.

As always, free advice is worth what you pay for it.
 

Last edited by justalurker; 01-08-08 at 04:29 PM.
 

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