Radon in water / GAC Filter system


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Old 01-07-08, 11:04 AM
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Radon in water / GAC Filter system

I am purchasing a house, and had the water tested for Radon. There are low Radon levels, but higher than the recommened limits set forth by the EPA.

I contacted a Profession Radon Mitigator, and he quoted me $1200 installed for the following:
Install (2) GAC tanks, 9” x 48” for the removal of radon from water.

Looking at the pictures he has on his website, it appears that this is simply an in-line whole house filter that uses two GAC Tanks.
http://www.usradon.com/images/gacsystem.jpg

In an attempt to save some money, I want to take on this project myself, and was wondering if I might be overlooking anything important, or if anyone else has attempted this, or has any input.

Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 11:40 AM
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Originally Posted by jesserup View Post
In an attempt to save some money, I want to take on this project myself, and was wondering if I might be overlooking anything important, or if anyone else has attempted this, or has any input.

Thanks in advance.
I would wonder if part of the $1200 price is certifying that the radon has been removed from the water and/or some scheduled compliance testing or maintenance of their system.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 11:42 AM
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Originally Posted by justalurker View Post
I would wonder if part of the $1200 price is certifying that the radon has been removed from the water and/or some scheduled compliance testing or maintenance of their system.
I could accomplish this myself with a home radon in water test for approx $30.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 12:05 PM
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Those GAC filters do not backwash so the carbon will need to be replaced at regular intervals. I wonder if that has to be done by certified techs and the old GAC handled and disposed of in a specific way a la EPA regs.

If it were me, I'd find out all the details of what they provide as far as hardware, installation, and down the road maintenance and service for $1200 and read the fine print real carefully.

There also appears to be two in-line filters before and after the two 9x48 tanks and you have not identified the filter elements inside.

Have you priced two 9x48 tanks, GAC, the appropriate tank hardware, fittings, the two in-line filters and elements, and plumbing?
 
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Old 01-07-08, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by justalurker View Post
Those GAC filters do not backwash so at some point the carbon will need to be replaced. I wonder if that has to be done by certified techs and the old GAC handled in a specific way.

If it were me, I'd find out all the details of what they provide as far as hardware, installation, and down the road maintenance and service for $1200 and read the fine print real carefully.

After all is said and done it's still your choice.
This is good advice. Thank you.
Is there anyone who might have experience installing one of these that can give me any pointers?
 
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Old 01-07-08, 01:43 PM
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There also appears to be two in-line filters before and after the two 9x48 tanks and you have not identified the filter elements inside.

Have you priced two 9x48 tanks, GAC, the appropriate tank hardware, fittings, the two in-line filters and elements, and plumbing?
 
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Old 01-07-08, 02:15 PM
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Originally Posted by justalurker View Post
There also appears to be two in-line filters before and after the two 9x48 tanks and you have not identified the filter elements inside.

Have you priced two 9x48 tanks, GAC, the appropriate tank hardware, fittings, the two in-line filters and elements, and plumbing?
I understand that there may be significant cost to the pieces/parts to this filter system - I would like to know if I am seeing all of the components needed, or if I am missing anything. I won't know the complete price untill I have all of the parts needed.

If anyone has any experience installing this system or anything like it, please feel free to chime in.
 
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Old 01-08-08, 07:48 AM
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I'd think you'd want backwashing units since these will eventually succumb to channeling. Certainly in the first unit, possibly in the second. Just my "layman" opinion. Have you looked into aeration methods of removal? Also, carbon is fully recyclable. Ask about their replacement program and if they recycle. What about their warranty? And finally, have someone else come and give you their pitch, just to see if there's something else you missed.
 
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Old 01-08-08, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by mabulok View Post
I'd think you'd want backwashing units
I thought of that but I wonder if one can't backwash carbon used to filter Radon for some regulatory reason.

I think there's more to this than may be apparent and multiple quotes from different companies that specialize in this is a good idea.
 
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Old 01-08-08, 08:06 AM
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Originally Posted by justalurker View Post
I thought of that but I wonder if one can't backwash carbon used to filter Radon for some regulatory reason.

I think there's more to this than may be apparent and multiple quotes from different companies that specialize in this is a good idea.
I don't think one can backwash the radon out of the carbon once it's trapped. But I would think this will make it much more efficient in removal by eliminating channels. But, yes, one more thing to research. Another consideration: the tanks WILL become radioactive and they should not be placed anywhere near the living area, or next to a wall that adjoins a living area. There is much more to this than meets the eye (i.e. than what the company giving his estimate is telling), and spending the time NOW will prevent buyers remorse later.
 
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Old 03-12-08, 11:37 PM
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Radon in water.

I've wrestled with this choice. We got the airborne radon in our basement down, but haven't done anything with the water yet. Our water levels are high enough that carbon isn't recommended; the recommendation is to use carbon only if the level is below 5000, because if it is higher that that, radiation will build up pretty quickly in the tank.

If you do it yourself, I think the main concerns are that radon reduction typically does not use any backwash, but you need to know that your water is pure enough to do that. Coconut shell carbon is recommended. I would probably get a single 12 x 52 instead of a pair of 9 x 48 tanks. Might be safer to get the pro to do the installation and post inspections unless you're pretty confident both in your water quality and your ability to install and monitor the setup. Good luck, would like to hear back if you do it yourself.
 
 

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