Soft Water to Ice Maker???


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Old 03-03-08, 01:54 PM
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Soft Water to Ice Maker???

I have a water softener that currently does not run to the ice maker in the fridge and the cold water line to the kitchen sink. There is however soft water running on the hot line to the dishwasher and kitchen sink. My grains of hardness are between 8-12. Is it advisable to have soft water running on the cold line to the sink and ice maker? Soft water is running everywhere else in the house, just not those two places.

The plumber ran a separate softened cold line that is currently not being use so changing it would be an easy fix. I was just wondering if anyone knew his logic behind this. Thanks.
 
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Old 03-03-08, 02:27 PM
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Hard water kills icemakers... simple as that.

At 12g hardness I'd install an under sink RO (reverse osmosis) fed with soft cold water and use the RO output for drinking water, cooking water, and feeding the icemaker. Your icemaker will last a lifetime and the cubes will be clear.

Your plumber's logic(?) is "old timer's" thinking that is dated and no longer relevant. People seem to think that drinking soft water is bad for you because there's "salt" in it.

There is NO SALT added to soften hard water. There are sodium or potassium ions exchanged with calcium ions in the hard water to soften it but the chlorides (what makes sodium chloride or potassium chloride a salt) are sent to drain when the softener regenerates.

It's the same outdated thinking that some plumbers believe when installing a softener only on the hot water. The soft(?) hot water will be hard wherever it meets cold... duh! All the expense of installing a water softener and few of the benefits of having soft water... a waste of time and money.

Plumbers are not water treatment professionals and never should be confused as such. I have run across plumbers who are competent softener installers but they are far and few between.
 
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Old 03-03-08, 02:31 PM
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If you run softened water to the sink then where would you get your water for cooking and drinking? I wouldn't do it. Same with the ice maker. The filter is a good idea though.

There are going to be those who disagree and happily slurp down softened water, and that is fine for them. It's not like it's going to kill you. But going out of your way to drink it is quite another matter.

Nashville Metro Water Services - Soft Water - It's Not For Drinking
 
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Old 03-03-08, 02:32 PM
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There is a belief by some that softened water is not good to consume.

The fact is that there is a very small amount of sodium in the treated water but for your hardness, in one gallon of water the sodium content would be roughly equal to the salt in two slices of bread.
You would never taste this.

The advantage is that your ice maker would be much less prone to being fouled with scale.
 
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Old 03-03-08, 02:47 PM
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The all too common mistake... there are SODIUM ions exchanged for calcium ions when softening water but there is NO SALT added to softened water.

Sodium is NOT salt. To be a salt, sodium would have to be SODIUM CHLORIDE.

Chemistry 101
 

Last edited by justalurker; 03-03-08 at 03:28 PM.
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Old 03-03-08, 03:39 PM
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You are right........thanks for the lesson.

To be clear though there is a perceived health risk in consuming softened water.
The added sodium that softened water contains has the same effect on the body as sodium chloride or salt does.
My understanding that the sodium in softened water is actually sodium bicarbonate.

I will add another common mistake which is the belief that using potassium chloride to regenerate softeners has health benefits over using sodium chloride.
The fact is that any person who for health reasons is on a sodium restricted diet must also restrict potassium as it has the same effect on unhealthy people as sodium does.

Chemistry 201

The biggest advantage to using potassium chloride over sodium chloride is that potassium chloride will encourage plant growth on and around a septic leech field as opposed to sodium chloride regeneration which can kill vegetation.

Horticulture 101
 
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Old 03-03-08, 03:52 PM
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Originally Posted by GregH View Post
You are right........thanks for the lesson.
My post was not intended as a lesson.
 

Last edited by justalurker; 03-03-08 at 04:53 PM.
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Old 03-03-08, 04:39 PM
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Nashville Article Rescinded

That Nashville Metro article was rescinded due false and misleading content.

http://wqa.org/sitelogic.cfm?ID=850#2000anchor

"Each year, WQA communicates with cities, regulators, newspapers, and other media to correct misinformation about our industry's products and services. In January 2006, the focus turned to Nashville, Tennessee. Their Metro Water Services department posted false and misleading information about consumption of softened water on its Web site. WQA contacted the agency in writing, refuted the aritcle's claims, and requested the misinformation be removed from the Web site. After receiving no response, an article was published in the January 2006 issue of WQA Industry Update. That WQA article was later picked up by another publication, which further directed the spotlight on Nashville's Metro Water Services. As a result, the public information officer for the water agency pulled the article. She has since asked her staff to work with WQA to clear up any misleading or inaccurate information about softened water. WQA members: If you are dealing with a municipality that is making false or misleading statements about water softeners or other technologies, contact WQA immediately, and we will work to correct the information. "





Originally Posted by core View Post
If you run softened water to the sink then where would you get your water for cooking and drinking? I wouldn't do it. Same with the ice maker. The filter is a good idea though.

There are going to be those who disagree and happily slurp down softened water, and that is fine for them. It's not like it's going to kill you. But going out of your way to drink it is quite another matter.

Nashville Metro Water Services - Soft Water - It's Not For Drinking
 
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Old 03-03-08, 05:37 PM
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Originally Posted by core View Post
Nashville Metro Water Services - Soft Water - It's Not For Drinking
Ditto: Greg

The article has long been pulled by the Nashville paper as being in accurate and misleading. The WQA has always brought that to the front to show how speculation and scare tactics are used by companies selling so-called non salt softeners.

That was a poor choice to counter drinking soft water issues. Frankly, I don't like to drink soft water but not due to health issues. I prefer RO water in all my beverages, ice and drinking water.

Andy Christensen, CWS-II
 
 

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